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11 votes

To which degree are Western and Eastern Armenian mutually intelligible?

Eastern and Western are just two codifications, the total dialect variation within Armenian is similar to that within English and arguably much less than that within German. As noted in the other ...
Adam Bittlingmayer's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Origin of the English word 'tooth' being pronounced /tʊθ/?

I don't know anything about the change in pronunciation of this particular word, so this is just a partial answer. The more general sound change this is a part of is shortening of /uː/ (from Middle ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Differences between Hong Kong Mandarin and southern Mandarin generally?

Much of the following answer comes from this 1999 study, as well as Cheng (2009), and some of my own experiences. Let's first get the usual suspects that identify Cantonese-accented Mandarin as a ...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,516
6 votes

To which degree are Western and Eastern Armenian mutually intelligible?

There are the following differences: The current Armenian language (which is also considered as Eastern Armenian) was created by Khachatur Abovian, who is best remembered for his novel, Wounds of ...
BigGinDaHouse's user avatar
4 votes

How is Nigerian Standard English categorized?

To the question Is Nigerian Standard English categorized as a discrete language, a dialect of English, or does it fall under some other category? the answer is: It is classified as a variety of ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
4 votes

Focus-marking in different varieties of Spanish

User tchrist made an excellent point in a comment to an answer by Mark Beadles, which probably deserves to be expanded into a separate answer: In many spoken varieties of Spanish, (3) will never be ...
John Goodrick's user avatar
3 votes

How is Nigerian Standard English categorized?

According to R. Hickey ( Legacies of Colonial English. Studies in Transported Dialect.), the Nigerian English, as most other African Englishes, should be classified as a part of common meta-cluster ...
Manjusri's user avatar
  • 2,781
2 votes
Accepted

How dialectal/linguistic variation in Plains Indian Sign Language

Unfortunately, the book Sign Languages, Cambridge Language Surveys series, 2010, edited by Diane Brentari, which has the “Variation and change” section, doesn't cover PISL, it is about modern sign ...
Yellow Sky's user avatar
  • 18.5k
1 vote

What is an example of a speech repertoire?

The term "speech repertoire" actually came from phonetics research in the 1950s. The use of the term "repertoire" in music appears to be relevant, but each "piece of music&...
Michaelyus's user avatar
  • 7,516
1 vote
Accepted

Is there any notion of a single "standard" dialect in various languages?

There is such a notion for some languages, which relates most strongly to written form. There are also pronunciation standards, which may or may not be adhered to by the populace. In the case of big ...
user6726's user avatar
  • 83.2k
1 vote

Other than Scottish rolled "r" and North American rhotacised vowels, are there any differences across "r" sounds in English dialects?

Between them, Tunny and Danger Fourpence have nicely covered much of Great Britain north of London. Southwest England The Westcountry dialect has the stereotypical retroflex "pirate" R, as ...
tea-and-cake's user avatar

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