13 votes
Accepted

Is there a voiced-unvoiced pair for R or L in any language?

As leoboiko mentioned, there are languages with voiceless liquids, like Icelandic. In the IPA, they are simply transcribed with a voicelessness ring diacritic: [r̥] and [l̥]. In Icelandic, these ...
brass tacks's user avatar
7 votes

Is there a voiced-unvoiced pair for R or L in any language?

Welsh has 'rh' and 'll' as the unvoiced counterparts of 'r' and 'l'.
HP Williams's user avatar
7 votes

Is there a voiced-unvoiced pair for R or L in any language?

I'm sure there's a lot, but one example would be Icelandic. hlít /l̥iːt/ ‘throughly’ lít /liːt/ ‘I look; you look’ hraða /r̥aːða/ ‘to speed up’ raða /raːða/ ‘to put in order; to employ’ Of course, ...
melissa_boiko's user avatar
6 votes

Is there a voiced-unvoiced pair for R or L in any language?

I'll just add a bit of fuel to the above fire. As Sumelic notes, Zulu (and other Nguni languages) have /ɮ, ɬ, l/. The fact that /ɮ, l/ contrast suggests that /ɬ/ which is a voiceless version of /ɮ/ is ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

Is there a voiced-unvoiced pair for R or L in any language?

Mehri has voiced and voiceless laterals, conventionally transcribed as “l” and “ś” respectively. Many scholars ascribe this contrast to proto-Semitic.
fdb's user avatar
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1 vote

Standard Deviation Of Fundamental Frequency Of Males and Females

A lot of things have to be clarified in your question. First, you need to say what the theoretical population of fundamental frequencies is – do you mean "in all instances of speech" (excluding ...
user6726's user avatar
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