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Can a stop be both voiced and aspirated?

Definitely yes, only your phonetic notation is not very correct. Proto-Indo-European had such stops, Sanskrit and most Indian languages have them, too ([bʱ], [d̪ʱ], [gʱ], [dʒʱ], [ɖʱ]), the very name ...
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11 votes
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Whispering in languages heavily dependent on pitch or phonation distinctions

Whispering excludes voicing from the linguistic inventory. Quite naturally, the decrease of the ability to comprehend a whispered speech depends on the language's original set of phonetic tools. Marc ...
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10 votes
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What is it called when a person pronounces the letter t in the word "metal" as something more similar to a d sound?

The phenomenon is known as "flapping", and the result, transcribed as [ɾ], is a "flap". It also applies to /d/, but people notice it most when applied to /t/ since the result is more different ...
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8 votes
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Anglicisation of the voiceless velar fricative [x]

Neither [h] nor [k] is "accurate" as a replacement for [x]: but there are some linguistic issues related to how [x] in a source language word appears in English, when the word is borrowed. The velar ...
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7 votes
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IPA Pronunciation of Unvoiced Consonants Seems Like Voiced

Typically, when a person cannot hear a difference between a voiceless stop and a voiced stop, as pronounced according to IPA principles, that is because the voiceless stop is unaspirated, and the ...
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6 votes
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The soft Spanish "t" (other languages are available)

I think you're just hearing the lack of aspiration; English and German "t" is generally aspirated at the start of a syllable, while Spanish and Italian generally lack aspiration on voiceless plosives (...
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6 votes

Evidence of connections between f0 and a physiological parameter?

Well, yes and no. Vocal F0 range is mainly determined by the length and thickness of the vocal folds. Inasmuch as neck circumference correlates with the size of the vocal folds inside the neck, you ...
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6 votes

Difference between voiced and lenis consonants in English

The terms reflect personal terminological preferences regarding certain consonants in English. "Voiced" usually refers to a physical property, that the vocal folds are vibrating during the ...
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5 votes
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Limitations of the parrot speech?

I don't think issue has been explored in a systematic way, and it's not clear how it could be. Theoretically, one might record human language contrasts like tal, thal, ttal uttered by a parrot (how do ...
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5 votes
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If we can say the following sounds when whispering

As for the voiced plosives you mentioned, that is b, g, d, and also affricates, such as j (as in jar, the unvoiced counterpart is ch in char)these are distinguished from their unvoiced counterparts by ...
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5 votes

Does assimilation of voice produce different phonemes, or just allophones?

They are called allomorphs. It refers to phonological variations of a same morpheme. See the In English suffixes section of the given wikipedia article. It gives an example of the past tense morpheme -...
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What does "fine-grained voicing distinctions" for consonants mean according to IPA?

It means that the phonetics of voicing, as observed in human languages, goes beyond just a two-way distinction between "vocal folds vibrating" vs. "vocal folds not vibrating". ...
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4 votes

Languages with a three-way distinction between voiced, aspirated, and unaspirated stops

Just to give you some more data, by analyzing the UPSID, I have come up with the following list of languages that specifically have this three way contrast in stops, and no other phonation ...
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4 votes
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If any phonologies / languages make a distinction between voiced/voiceless nasals, approximants, vowels, trills, or flaps

Certainly! Ancient Greek /r/ had an unvoiced allophone [r̥], which was written as rh in Latin transcriptions (see "rhino", "diarrhea"). Old Norse had phonemic /l̥ r̥ n̥/, which contrasted with /l r ...
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4 votes
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Does assimilation of voice produce different phonemes, or just allophones?

There is no clear answer to the title question in general; it may depend on the sounds, or the language. (Well, unless you define "assimilation" in such a way as to explicitly refer to a ...
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4 votes
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Mechanism of glottal stop - effect on tension in vocal cords

I think the answer is, no, we cannot tell you. One reason is that there isn't just one thing "glottal stop". There is a dissertation Production and perception of glottal stops which covers the ...
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4 votes
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Lengthened voiced stops and the airstream through the nose

It is possible that you do lower the velum when you do this, and velum lowering is one of the methods that is used to alleviate the pressure buildup of voiced stops, but it is also possible that your ...
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In what circumstances is d devoiced in English?

One factor is the individual: some individuals devoice more than others. Then you have to look at context, but additionally you have to be more specific about what you are measuring (and I should add ...
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Why does /zd-/ require more effort even though both the consonants have the same voicing?

This is just a subjective feeling that really depends on your native language or the languages you are used to speaking. Other languages are fine with this particular combination. For example, in my ...
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4 votes

Correlation Between Voicing and Place of Articulation?

A better way to put it is that it's more difficult to maintain voicing in stops at the back of the mouth. Voicing requires a drop in pressure across the glottis, and stops close off the oral cavity. ...
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3 votes

non-aspirated voiceless stops versus their voiced counterparts before a vowel

Phonetically, the main theory I've heard is that voiced/voiceless/aspirated consonants are distinguished by voice onset time. VOT is the time delta between when the consonant stops and when the vocal ...
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3 votes

If any phonologies / languages make a distinction between voiced/voiceless nasals, approximants, vowels, trills, or flaps

but I'm wondering if there are the same sort of voiced/voiceless distinctions for nasals / approximants / trills / flaps / affricates / vowels / etc. These exist, but they are rare because they're ...
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3 votes
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Do Persian Jews voice Hebrew ק?

The name Jacob is well-known among Jews, Christians and Muslims. In Iran this name is known in all communities in the Arabic/Qurʼanic form Yaʻqūb يعقوب but in Persian the Arabic letter q ق is ...
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3 votes
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How does passing air through a narrow glottis cause vibrations?

The process that results in the oscillation of the vocal folds is actually somewhat complicated and may be tricky to grasp if you are "not good at physics", but let's give it a shot! A somewhat vague ...
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3 votes

Does Mandarin Chinese have phonetically voiced plosives, fricatives, or affricates (besides "r" = [ʐ] / [ɻ])?

There's no rule that says Mandarin unaspirated stops CAN'T be voiced. The point is that there are no minimal pairs between voiced and unvoiced unaspirated stops. The actual phonetic realization- in ...
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Is the consonant [b] always voiced across languages? What about [p]?

I would add that, phonetically, voice is a matter of timing, more precisely of the VOT or Voice-Onset Time, which refers to the time when your vocal folds begin to vibrate with respect to the moment ...
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3 votes

Lengthened voiced stops and the airstream through the nose

If you're producing nasals then you must be allowing your velum to drop. No fair. You have to find some way to enlarge the closed air cavity above your larynx. There are several ways to do this. ...
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3 votes

What is it called when a person pronounces the letter t in the word "metal" as something more similar to a d sound?

Flapping applies to intervocalic syllable offset alveolar stops. This formulation assumes some things that are less than obvious. For one thing, it assumes that syllabic and glide r count as vowels, ...
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3 votes

Is /v/ cross-linguistically semi-voiced and powerless in devoicing preceding consonants in case of regressive assimilation? How to explain it?

I don't have an explanation from a synchronic phonetic perspective. From a diachronic and phonological perspective, /v/ in many languages, including Danish and Russian, developed from earlier /w/. ...
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