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8 votes

Could some European languages get phonemic vowel length in future?

It absolutely can happen, and indeed it has done in the past couple of decades in at least one instance! In his book, English after RP, Geoffrey Lindsey describes the phonetics Standard Southern ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 8,809
4 votes
Accepted

Were long vowels distinguished in cuneiform?

In Akkadian, Ca-a, Cu-u, Ci-i are often used to indicate Semitic long vowels, but this is not consistent. For example, dabābu “word” is usually written as da-ba-bu, but sometimes it appears as da-ba-...
fdb's user avatar
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3 votes

Why do some linguists say vowel length isn't contrastive in Italian?

"Stress in Italian is mostly length, isn't it?" I'm not sure what you mean by this. If you mean "stress in Italian is mostly realized as phonetic length", it might or might not be true, but it isn't ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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3 votes

Why do some linguists say vowel length isn't contrastive in Italian?

The main reason is that it is (given the definition of contrast) not contrastive. The exercise of phonemicization requires that you start with phonetically transcribed data, not removing phonetic ...
user6726's user avatar
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3 votes

The relationship between Mora-timed languages, long vowels and quantitative verse, also the status of Iranian and Balto-Slavo-Germanic?

First, the division of languages into stress-timed, syllable-times and mora-timed is wishful thinking. Phonetic timing differences between languages are much richer than implied by this division. ...
user6726's user avatar
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2 votes

Is the concept of 'long vowel' still relevant in modern English phonology?

In fact, many people have been interested in exploring these kinds of ideas (that synchronic English phonology is closer to English orthography than is usually thought). It comes across to me as ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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2 votes

Could some European languages get phonemic vowel length in future?

Most European language with phonemic vowel length have this as an inherited feature, but some languages have lost this feature during their development, e.g. Latin has phonemic vowel length, but ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
1 vote

Could some European languages get phonemic vowel length in future?

An example in American English (west coast dialects) comes from reduction of Vr and simplification of rr sequences. This gives rise to minimal pairs: [tɛɹ] "tear (rip, not cry)" vs [tɛ:ɹ] &...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

Feature correlates of the length and tenseness contrast in the low vowel /a/

You cannot look at the phonology of a language and predict the phonetic realization of its low vowel. The horse is the phonetics and the cart is the phonology: you start with knowledge of how a vowel ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

How does phonemic variation in vowel quantity (but not quality) work in e.g. songs?

I'm not actually sure what you are asking about – "phonemic variation in vowel quantity (but not quality) work in e.g. songs". Indeed, "long" vs "short" vowels in Germanic are typically associated ...
user6726's user avatar
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1 vote

How does phonemic variation in vowel quantity (but not quality) work in e.g. songs?

Songs are special since melody and rhythm dictate the length of a note. A lot of contrasts that are made in speech are neutralised in songs. The rules for singing German songs prescribe only "pure ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar

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