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10 votes

What is the difference between two symbols: /i/ and /ɪ/?

In Southern Standard British English, also know as RP, there are two highish, frontish unrounded vowels: the FLEECE and KIT vowels, /i:/ and /ɪ/. The former is the vowel heard in the word fleece, the ...
8 votes

What is the difference between two symbols: /i/ and /ɪ/?

There are three relevant lexical sets here: FLEECE, KIT, and HAPPY. (HAPPY is specifically the last vowel in the word "happy", not the first, since it doesn't appear in monosyllables.) In ...
  • 56.2k
5 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between [j w] and [i̯ u̯]?

There's not necessarily any difference. One of the weaknesses of the IPA is that it considers consonants and vowels totally separate things and describes them with totally separate parameters. This ...
  • 56.2k
5 votes
Accepted

IPA confusion, difference between these vowels?

The IPA has a website with expert productions of the symbols, which will include all of the examples that you are interested. That page is here. The site you linked to is "just some guy", ...
  • 71.7k
5 votes
Accepted

is schwa a phoneme in English?

First, "allophone" is the wrong term to use for many-to-one mappings between phonemes and surface realizations. Allophonic rules are not neutralizing, so final devoicing in German (for ...
  • 71.7k
4 votes
Accepted

Are syllable-timed languages with reduced vowels a thing?

Almost by definition, there cannot be. If every syllable in a syllable-timed language has the same duration, then a change from vowel A to vowel B would not be reduction (which applies to "weak&...
  • 71.7k
4 votes
Accepted

Does double tone mean long vowel?

Several tone glyphs in a row are used in the languages that have contour tones, the tones which can change within the syllable. The first tone glyph shows the pitch at which the tone begins, the last ...
  • 16.6k
4 votes

What is the difference between two symbols: /i/ and /ɪ/?

/i/ and /ɪ/ are standard IPA representations for two different principal vowels, respectively high front unrounded and mid-high front unrounded (some people prefer "close" as opposed to &...
  • 6,684
3 votes
Accepted

Is the sound change /y/ > /i/ more common than /y/ > /u/? Are there any good examples of /y/ shifting to /u/?

In Uzbek, Proto-Turkic *ü > u, e.g.: Proto-Turkic *üč (“three”) > Uzbek uch /utʃ/ Proto-Turkic *kün (“day”) > Uzbek kun Proto-Turkic *yǖŕ (“face”) > Uzbek yuz From among some two dozen ...
  • 16.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Confusion about compression vs. protrusion in rounded vowels

Although I think it is correct to distinguish compression and protrusion, both are typically subsumed under one notion of rounding in phonetics. Therefore I would suggest discarding interest in "...
  • 71.7k
2 votes

IPA confusion, difference between these vowels?

This problem is often when in your native language/dialect those sounds are allophonically bound. In other words, for you [ɒ/ɔ/o] are just possible realisation of your native phoneme /o/ or /a/. This ...
  • 461
2 votes
Accepted

Ioticism in Greek

Mergers to /i/ are not uncommon in general. The asymmetrical development of η, ει, ω, ου to [i, i, o, u] reminds me of how Middle English /ɛː/ /eː/ /ɔː/ /oː/ become early modern English [iː, iː, oː, ...
  • 16.9k
2 votes
Accepted

Is it useful to render French /i y u/ and /j ɥ w/ as allophones?

It is in fact proposed, in Schane (1968) that French glides derive from vowels. Morin (1971: "Computer experiments in generative phonology: Low-level French phonology") pursues this further ...
  • 71.7k
2 votes
Accepted

Why does /ɑ/ sounds so similar to [ɔ]?

Many American English speakers, myself included, have no phonemic distinction between /ɑ/ and /ɔ/ (and /ɒ/ for that matter). This means that it's not an issue for us to realize an /ɑ/-like vowel in a ...
  • 56.2k
2 votes
Accepted

can a sibilant consonant like /s/ and /ʃ/ cause centralization of a following vowel?

Yes and no. If you are looking at the whole set of contextual sound alternations across languages, there is little realistic hope for demanding some degree of phonetic "naturalness" to such ...
  • 71.7k
1 vote

Where is the father vowel found in English?

My "modernized" Boston accent keeps the broad a sound as a separate phoneme while having lost the Trap-Bath distinction. In adddition to nearly all clearly marked loan words(shAH, LAs Vegas, ...
1 vote

is schwa a phoneme in English?

It is not an allophone for sure. An allophone must be associated with a single phoneme; [ə] isn't, it's associated with multiple phonemes. You might want to consider it as a phoneme or not, but that ...
  • 165
1 vote

Why does /ɑ/ sounds so similar to [ɔ]?

The pronunciation of the sole low vowel, in languages that have just one low vowel, is highly variable compared to mid and high vowels, and this is related to the fact that back / round contrast in ...
  • 71.7k
1 vote

Is it useful to render French /i y u/ and /j ɥ w/ as allophones?

/lu.ua/ (loup où ah) is not the same as /lu.a/ (loua). If you want to avoid /lwa/ for loi, you would want to use the non-syllabic diacritic: /lu̯a/ or a lower or upper tie bar /lo͜a/ /lo͡a/ to make ...
  • 208
1 vote

why pronunciations of cardinal vowel No.4 [a] are so different?

The four corner vowels have a special place, because they were defined by Jones in terms of "extremes". Other vowels are (poorly) defined in terms of auditory interpolation between ...
  • 71.7k
1 vote

What would /ɯ/ most likely be replaced by?

I'm afraid no-one has collected comprehensive data yet for sound shifts due to borrowing/naturalizing foreign sounds. As a substitute we have some diachronic data (link to the Searchable Index ...
1 vote

Glottal approximate and rhotic consonants and R-colored vowels

The only reason for not doing so is that it's not clear what sense of "is" you have in mind. Specifically, what do you mean by "r", and at what level of analysis are you asking ...
  • 71.7k

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