czypsu
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Proposed binary divisions of Proto-Indo-European
12 votes

As for the centum-satem distinction, nowadays indoeuropeanists usually don't think of it as a west-east dialect division but they rather view the satem palatalisation as an innovation which took place ...

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Is [x] any different from [kʰ]?
Accepted answer
10 votes

They are indeed articulated in the same place, namely the part of the palate called velum. These are, then, velar consonants. The difference lies in the manner of articulation. [kʰ] is an aspirated ...

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The accentual (Tone) system of Ancient Greek
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6 votes

As for the last part of your question: Ancient Greek indeed had some rules of accentuation, despite the fact that the position and type of it was not always possible to be determined on phonetic basis ...

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German (-stell-) and Slavic (-stav-) languages: who was first?
4 votes

The German -stell- forms and Slavic -stav- are neither related nor borrowed in one way or another. The 'clearly corresponding prefixes' may very well be just a coincidence. Slavic root * stāw- is a ...

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Can a case system in a language help resolve gramatical ambiguites?
4 votes

In Polish, ambiguity in that case is not existent. I killed the man with a spoon (man with spoon) - Zabiłem człowieka z łyżką I killed the man with a spoon (using a spoon) - Zabiłem człowieka ...

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Have Latin and Romance languages evolved from vowel to consonant variety?
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3 votes

Latin had a pretty standard vowel set: two high vowels - front /i/ and back /u/ two mid vowels - front /e/ and back /o/ one low vowel - central /a/ Each vowel had a long and short version. Long ...

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How many vowels and how many consonants did the Proto-Indo-European Language have?
3 votes

As for the vowels. There are couple of approaches. The reductionist approach (embraced for example by the Leiden school) curtails the reconstruction to just 2 phonological vowels, /e/ and /o/, ...

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Which languages contrast /ɕ/ and /ʃ/?
3 votes

Sanskrit contrasted three sibilants, two of which most probably were [ɕ] and [ʂ] (or [ʃ]). The former was an outcome of an Proto-Indo-Iranian affricate that developed from PIE voiceless palatalised ...

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Recognize this script?
3 votes

That looks like Hebrew cursive script Some of the letters seem to be incomprehensible for me but I assume that is due to the writer's personal style. Hebrew cursive can differ dramatically between ...

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Sound correspondences in Germanic languages
2 votes

Since Germanic languages descend from a single Proto-Germanic parent language, and sound change (neogrammarian, exceptionless) is responsible for a giant part of the language change, there will be ...

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Place feature metathesis
2 votes

In Greek declensions there are a couple examples of metathesis quantitatis which is simply vowel length swapping. Within the second declension we have the Attic declension which consists of nouns ...

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Is the general concept behind "Eskimo words for snow" true?
2 votes

There is a great book on that topic - Language : The Cultural Tool by Daniel Everett. He states, contrary to the Chomskyan notions, that languages' features are shaped almost exlusively by the ...

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If someone grows up bilingually, with what accent will they speak a third language they learn as an adult?
1 votes

Having an accent while speaking a foreign language is just applying the phonetics of the native language to the new one. Having said that, I would assume that in a situation when a bilingual speaker ...

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How did it happen that K was introduced to Latin alphabet in place of C and C started to mark /t͡s/ or /s/ in many languages?
1 votes

About the second part of your question. The spelling very often represents pronunciation that was once used (although this is not a rule). The C in the spelling systems of modern Romance languages ...

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Are different "aspects" of a Polish verb the same lexeme or different lexemes?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Let's make following assumptions : Lexeme is a group of inflectional forms connected by the core semantics, the most primitive meaning that points the recipient to a vague semantic cloud Perfective ...

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North American English: R Muscles and Linguistic Description
1 votes

The sound is called retroflex approximant, which means that it produces a stream of air not narrow enough to be classified as a fricative consonant("sh","v") but also not wide enough to be classified ...

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Is historical linguistics still producing new results?
0 votes

There are whole deserts covered with bazalt stones bearing incredible numbers of Semitic inscriptions, connected to the general idea of Pre-Islamic Old Arabic waiting to be deciphered, edited and ...

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Do there exist any languages that use inflection to create questions?
0 votes

Japanese has a particle /ka/ <か> added to the end of the sentence that marks it as a question. Declarative: Anata wa nihonjin desu Question: Anata wa nihonjin desu ka

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Can you explain glottal stop?
0 votes

Well, it is a consonant. It is produced by stopping the airflow in the same way as in producing [p],[k] or [t], it is just made in different place. While the aforementioned obstruents are ...

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The grammatical subject, the logical subject, and something new
0 votes

In this instance, in this sentence: "That I know". "That" is just a direct object, the subject is unambiguously "I". Both the logical and syntactical subject.

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