Stephane Rolland
  • Member for 9 years, 6 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
Why does schwa have a special place among vowels?
16 votes

When I pronounce this vowel, I would say it is the only one where there is absolutely no contraction of any muscle (except vibrating vocal chords) or any change in the mouth/throat/larynx/pharynx, and ...

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What is LOLspeak, and does it have equivalents in languages other than English?
5 votes

In France, such a language is called "langage SMS", or "Kikoo Lol". (Kikoo, as a transformation of Coucou which means Hello!, and LOL taken from the english). It's mostly due to the use of short SMS ...

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Why is the word "idiot" so similar between multiple languages?
4 votes

When searching for the etymology "idiot" I get: For French: https://fr.wiktionary.org/wiki/idiot For English: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/idiot Both are stating: from Latin idiota, from ...

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Which language would be easiest for a computer to parse?
3 votes

I have also tried to design a language based on the regularity of esperanto... but well... too much recursive definitions for atoms, thus I ended up in approximatively nothing serious. But having ...

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Can you write Japanese in only Hiragana, or only Katakana, or only Chinese characters?
2 votes

Kanji: You would not write entirely with Kanji (Chinese characters). As stated in the comments "it would feel archaic or outdated, like using Middle English spellings or something". Nowadays Kanjis do ...

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Plural "you" in different language families connoting respect
2 votes

In former English there was also the same distinction: thou/thy/thee/thine - you/your/you/yours. e.g. in the bible sentences like 'Thou shall not kill'. In French, there was also the 3rd person ...

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Are there any languages or cultures where people speak while inhaling?
1 votes

Just to add to the list of special cases, in French, when someone has made a big mistake, or if something really risky is ongoing, one can do an ingressive sound to signify the high probably that ...

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Marking phoneme boundaries - how to decide on the transitions?
1 votes

Only a proposal: The problem seems to be: having a clear definite point to determine whether you are in one vocal or another for example. As you said you could define transition zones. And then ...

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Do German and English share the same word roots?
1 votes

As you are interested in seeing the relation more clearly between English and German while learning German: I ULTRA recommend the German Language courses by Michel Thomas. He explains the ...

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Density of information/semantic of Chinese and Korean language versus european languages
Accepted answer
1 votes

My question is really about Chinese vs. English, minimally. But the different valuable comments and the previous answer made me consider the problem differently. Explained below, I arrive to a ratio ...

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Which Romance languages have reflexes of the Latin nominative in nouns?
1 votes

In French: the word meaning field champs comes from campus nominative rather than campum accusative I suppose the word republique comes from res publica nominative rather than rem publicam accusative....

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Do I need to learn Esperanto?
1 votes

I would not say, "go for it before learning Italian, Spanish, Portugese, French or Romanian..." However, if you're tempted... it will expose your mind to a linguist life's work. I think Esperanto ...

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Which language is the closest lexically to Spanish?
0 votes

NB: The problem with the other answer by guifa is: it claims that there is no methodology behind the lexical distances used in the map in question, and that those numbers are meaningless. I'm ill at ...

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What are those languages with no one-to-one correspondence between sound and written symbol?
0 votes

Esperanto: I'd say that Esperanto is one of those languages. I don't remember a change in pronouciation possible. The only exception maybe being the commonplace use of letter x, but this is due to ...

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Triggering emotions with language
0 votes

Not only words are learnt. But also the connotation behind words change, and it is linked to emotion. c.f. the Theseus Ship paradox: the identity of a person is an illusion. For example after ...

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