Kenny Lau
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Why does French "cheveu(x)" have "eu" and not "eau"?
Accepted answer
9 votes

L /kasˈtɛl.lʊm/ > VL /kasˈtɛl.lũ/ > OF /t͡ʃahˈtɛl/ > MF /ʃaˈtɛau/> F /ʃaˈto/ L /ˈwɛ.tʊ.lʊm/ > VL /ˈβɛ.lũ/ > /ˈvjɛ.lu/ > OF /vjɛl/ > MF /vjɛu/ > F /vjø/ L /kaˈpɪl.lʊm/ ...

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Etymology of Sanskrit नारक / नरक [nāraka / naraka]
5 votes

नर (nara) This is from Proto-Indo-European *h₂nḗr. Cognates include Ancient Greek ἀνήρ, genitive ᾰ̓νδρός, whence English andro-. नरक (naraka) According to hi.wiktionary: पुराणों और धर्मशास्त्रों ...

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wals chapter 136 m-t pronouns paradigmatic
4 votes

According to WALS chapter 136, the languages are divided according to their words for the first and second person singular pronouns. The M-T languages are the languages which have an /M/ sound (or ...

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Can we conclude that morpheme is ALWAYS greater than syllable?
2 votes

In Spanish, the word "era" (was) can take no syllables, for example: Adorarte para mi era obsesión The part "mi era obsesión", when transcribed in IPA, would become /mi̯e.ɾao̯b.se.sjon/, wherein ...

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Weekday Abbreviations in multiple languages
2 votes

Chinese and Japanese: Chinese: In Chinese, Monday to Saturday are from 星期一 to 星期六, which basically just mean "weekday 1" to "weekday 6". Sunday is an exception, being called "...

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Is there a trend toward more homophones over time? What can counteract that trend?
1 votes

Splitters There are actually splitters. In the Cantonese language (my native language), there was a historical splitter around a century ago, in which the high flat tone was split into two tones (53 ...

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"h" in French words of Germanic / onomatopoeic origin
1 votes

From the article Aspirated h on en.wiki: The name of the now-silent h refers not to aspiration but to its former pronunciation as the voiceless glottal fricative [h] in Old French and in Middle ...

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Abstract analysis
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0 votes

I hope I am answering the question. When Spanish was evolving very early (600AD plus or minus 400 years), a process called "vowel breaking" occured, which basically turned some [o] into [we], and ...

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