ktm5124
  • Member for 5 years, 4 months
  • Last seen more than 1 year ago
  • Chicago, IL
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It would seem that interfixes are phonemes but not morphemes. This makes more sense to me personally. What is a morpheme if it does not have meaning? Better to call them phonemes and not morphemes. Or to think in terms of allomorphs as @AlexB. suggests.

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"A morpheme is the smallest grammatical unit in a language. In other words, it is the smallest meaningful unit of a language." (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morpheme) "Interfix, or, more commonly, linking element, is a term in linguistics and more specifically, phonology. It describes a phoneme which is placed in between two morphemes and does not have a semantic meaning." (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interfix)

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Does it sound awkward when people don't use them in conversation?

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I would call it rather a related question as @suizokukan has done.

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@MarkBeadles I don't think so, because that question does not involve French, or more specifically, trouver.

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It would be interesting to fill in two details. First, how did Norse come to influence the English preposition? Second, was its association with the Latin cum primarily a result of translating the Vulgate into English?

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Thanks for the clear and informative answer. Particle of separation is a useful description of *wi. The Sanskrit cognate is also quite cool, combining two familiar parts.

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