Aryaman
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Etymology of Sanskrit नारक / नरक [nāraka / naraka]
8 votes

The etymology is not entirely certain. The historical linguist Manfred Mayrhofer in his Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Altindoarischen (vol. 1, pg. 37) essentially says (this is paraphrased from German)...

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Are Hindi "Bigul" (बिगुल) and English "Bugle" cognates?
Accepted answer
7 votes

Shyamsundara Dasa's Hindi Shabdasagar dictionary has an entry (link): बिगुल संज्ञा पुं० [अं०] अँगरेजी ढंग की एक प्रकार की तुरही जो प्रायः सैनिकों को एकत्र करने अथवा इसी प्रकार का कोई और काम करने के ...

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What might've *bhes- imitated?
6 votes

I would imagine it is referring to the sound of someone breathing outwards (in fact, I anecdotally know someone whose snoring sounds like that), but as is the case with all pre-Proto-Indo-European ...

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Why are there so many 'a' sounds in Sanskrit?
6 votes

From Proto-Indo-European to Proto-Indo-Iranian it has been theorized that *e, *o, and the sometimes reconstructed *a all merged into *a (some exceptions such as Brugmann's law--*o > *ā in open ...

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What is "case"?
6 votes

This is actually a very well-thought out and interesting question, one that I have asked as well, as a non-linguist. In simple terms, a case is essentially any change to the form of the word that ...

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Could have inflected Proto-Slavic really 'been created' as a lingua franca among some Slavs and many agglutinative, Turkic languages-speaking peoples?
4 votes

I would love someone else to answer this more fully, but one thing I would like to point out is the assumption in this question that more inflection implies greater complexity in language. The reality ...

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Doesn't Sanskrit use adpositions of any kind?
3 votes

Adding on to jknappen's answer, here is a relevant page on prepositions from MacDonnell's Sanskrit grammar available freely online on Wikisource: link. There are many other reference grammars for ...

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Any other example of "socially stigmatized phoneme" like the "th" sound in some Venetian dialect?
3 votes

In Hindi the usage of only /s/ in the place of /ʃ/ /ʂ/ and /s/ generally makes one sound less educated. Same with the realization of the monophthongs /ɛː/ and /ɔː/ as diphthongs /əɪ/ and /əʊ/. These ...

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Is there a linguistic difference between slang and colloquial speech?
3 votes

Slang is generally very informal language used a specific segment of speakers of a language. An example of slang (that I just found on the internet) is the word "Bandini", which is supposedly a word ...

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Do there exist languages with wh-prepositions?
2 votes

Hindi kind of has this feature: किस (चीज़) पे खिलौना रखा? kis (cIz) pe khilonA rakhA? What did you put the toy on? किसने किया? kisne kiyA? Who did it? किस is the oblique form ...

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Do natively bilingual people have accents in one or both of their languages?
1 votes

Anecdotally, no (but research does concur with my account, for example the Handbook of Bilingualism has many relevant chapters). I have been raised a native Hindi and English speaker from birth, and ...

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Examples of Borrowing Languages
1 votes

I think this has more to do with not being a prestige language. English was a "borrowing language" because all higher-level vocabulary was coined in Latin historically, and Latin was the prestige ...

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Difference in translating Sanskrit words कोप​ [kopa] and क्रोध [krodha]
1 votes

कोप and क्रोध are not cognates (or more accurate, doublets, since they are in the same language). They have different Sanskrit roots (कुप् and क्रुध्) and no proposed common source in Proto-Indo-...

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House vs. home in other languages
1 votes

In Hindi घर (ghar) can mean both "house" and "home". मकान (maka:n) only means "house" but is a pretty common word nevertheless.

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Devanagari digit variants
1 votes

I have a feeling that these are regional. I've only ever used and read the standard "Bombay" forms (I'm actually from Delhi though).

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Inanimate pronouns in Hindi
1 votes

In Hindi, he/she/it are a single pronoun, i.e. there is no distinction between inanimate and animate. The only distinction in pronouns is distance (near and far) and number (singular and plural). The ...

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Does Sanskrit really have a large proportion of borrowings from non IE stock?
0 votes

Adding on to Yellow Sky's answer, at the Indo-Iranian stage there is theorized to have been a substrate language spoken where the Bactria–Margiana Archaeological Complex (BMAC) is located in Central ...

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Etymological origins of the Hindi word Afeem
0 votes

It is also possible that Arabic أفيون ʾafyūn was borrowed into Hindi-Urdu and later remodelled on the English opium, explaining the final m in afīm. This would also make sense historically since the ...

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Abbreviations for pinyin and hepburn transliterations?
0 votes

ISO has some standard romanization systems listed at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ISO_romanizations. Pinyin is ISO 7098, but unfortunately no other systems of Chinese romanizations have been ...

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