Joop Eggen
  • Member for 9 years
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Is Esperanto accepting new root words?
10 votes

Esperanto does both. One can introduce a neologism, a new international term. Or by combining existing word parts. Not introducing new words is considered optimal, as it saves in words to know. ...

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"Den" or "det" in Swedish
3 votes

Two, three homonyms lag (different meanings, identically written/sounding words), here with two genders for the articles: en/et. A German example with the same phenomenon: die Steuer = the tax, das ...

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English verbs with more than one past tense
Accepted answer
3 votes

kneeled / knelt, chided / chid. Irregular verbs that became regularized.

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Does language improve over time, or does it just change?
3 votes

English spelling did deteriorate, due to almost abruptive historical changes. It will never become phonetic (nation versus national), and we won't see much reform there besides through/thru. So ...

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What stats are available to estimate the possibly coming "World language"?
2 votes

It seems qualitative requirements of such a World Language have still not been mentioned. Other qualifications: The (as yet) failed Esperanto shows that pure rationality is not the sole issue. (I am ...

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Is Language infinite?
2 votes

This question targets mental processes, cognition, far more than language. Can one formulate for oneself some (mathematical) concept. There are many non-linguistic examples, where symbolic ...

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How fast is the number of languages spoken today decreasing/increasing?
1 votes

Languages often disappear when they coexist with an other language. Official languages are often institutionalized (national, supranational), whereas dialects are in general more volatile (currently ...

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Do central language regulation bodies accelerate or inhibit orthography changes?
1 votes

In general language standardisation happens after changes in the language communities. Only reforms in Chinese is a counter-example. The impetus of changes derives of the cultural changes in the ...

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"Maybe" in German (vielleicht)
1 votes

The English perhaps: can happen, and the Dutch misschien (geschieden): might happen have similar roots. The German vielleicht seems to deviate on first sight, but there is the Dutch wel-licht with ...

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Why are artificial languages created always by individuals and not by international institutions?
1 votes

You are talking about mental design. Looking at Esperanto, and its initial creator, the non-linguist Zamenhof. He actually took years playing with notions (not entirely alone), and there are many ...

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why is syntax interesting?
0 votes

One can scientifically have logical notions and models on language, that is knowledge. "How it is encoded in the brain" is still a large unknown, not really a denotable calculatory model. One might ...

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How to figure out how a language may force one to think
0 votes

Fundamental language differences are rare. Considering the existence of plural maybe allows over-generalisations, hence ethnic prejudices. That would be a bit far-fetched argument. W.r.t. normal ...

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Why do English, Italian, German, Spanish, French and Latin share a common alphabet and many words?
0 votes

Because nations and national languages grew out of a standardization/demarcation of regional spoken dialects which did not have closed borders, and were alike to neighbors (a communication media). ...

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Has anyone here successfully learned another language?
0 votes

Low threshhold: internet news, internet television, subtitled movies. Reading of light lecture. Passover in the country, at best something like a pen pal conference, goal oriented (whatever is of ...

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Why aren't the number of syllables in constructed languages like Esperanto minimized?
0 votes

As an aposteriori language Esperanto takes its words from existing languages. It does however have the notion of word stem plus -o for noun, -a for adjective, -as for verb present tense, and so on. ...

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Does the term "(highly) agglutinating language" refer to inflectional endings, word-formation processes, or both?
-1 votes

As to the definition wikipedia, agglutinative language Esperanto indeed is highly-agglutinative. And "malsanulejo" (there exists a hundred year old alternative, but rare, "hospitalo") indeed is often ...

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