drammock
  • Member for 9 years
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Is there an easy way to type IPA?
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7 votes

The SIL keyboards that you linked to are indeed the best of breed. Like any input method for typing outside of ASCII, it takes an investment of time to learn the keystroke sequences, but in my opinion ...

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Should I use square brackets or slashes when transcribing an oral text in IPA?
6 votes

Since your stated goal is to compare someone's actual pronunciation with some standard pronunciation, you should use square brackets, to indicate that you are talking about actually pronounced sounds. ...

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[a̟]: advanced front vowel?
5 votes

Co-editor of PHOIBLE here. In the feature system used in PHOIBLE, a is considered to have features -front and -back — i.e., a (low) central vowel, not a (low) front vowel. Therefore you would think ...

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Is [ë̞] another symbol for [ə]?
4 votes

Typically linguists use such diacritics when the sound they're describing is in between the sounds associated with unmodified base glyphs of the IPA. So I would not expect the author to write [ë̞] to ...

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Why does Polish have male and female accents?
4 votes

I have known a few languages other than Polish throughout my lifetime, which include Russian, English, French, Greek, and Hebrew, but in none of them have I observed any consistent difference between ...

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"Character sets" for top 100 languages (as opposed to Unicode)
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4 votes

Richard Ishida has a ton of online tools related to unicode and orthography. The most useful one for your purposes is probaby the Character Usage Lookup tool. Not a database, but you might be able ...

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Detailed "quality" of /ð/
4 votes

Regarding (a), it is quite common for /ð/ to have an allophonic realization as [d̪] (dental stop) or [d̪ð] (dental affricate) in syllable onset position. I don't hear a huge difference between your ...

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What are those languages with no one-to-one correspondence between sound and written symbol?
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4 votes

For your question to make sense, it would have to be a question about particular language-orthography pairs (and if in talking about sound-symbol correspondences we interpret "sound" to mean "phoneme",...

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Dental fricatives for Brazilian Portuguese speakers
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4 votes

If you look at phonetic implementation of these sounds, American English /ð/ is often pronounced a lot like an affricate [̪dð] when in onset position (not just in the stereotyped pronunciation of ...

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Which languages other than Chinese have apical vowels?
2 votes

Languages besides Modern Standard Mandarin that are thought to have apical vowels include Nuosu, Lisu, Ersu, Shixing, Achang, Ahi. It is argued in this paper that the appropriate analysis of Modern ...

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How to annotate the difference between blended vowels and non-blended vowels
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2 votes

There are a couple of ways that the IPA can annotate such differences. The first is a tiebar: u͡a (unicode 0361) or u͜a (unicode 035C). Use of a tiebar is usually taken to indicate "these two vowels ...

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Word reduction and American T before consonant
1 votes

I agree with @greg-lee that there is probably secondary stress on "it" in your example sentence. Regarding your second question about the t sound: you are correct that the /t/ in /ɪt wʌz gʊd/ is often ...

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Narrow Phonetic Transcription: Stretching?
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0 votes

To my knowledge there is no official (or even conventional) symbol to describe that gesture. If I had to pick a symbol to describe "tongue spreading", I might pick U+20E1: combining left-right arrow ...

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