Nick Nicholas
  • Member for 4 years, 8 months
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If any of these stranger human voice sounds have IPA annotations
3 votes

More extensive than extIPA are the Voice Quality Symbols which build on them; they still don't meet all of OP's requirements, but there's some amusement to be had with e.g. {И} electrolaryngeal ...

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Is there a single origin for the connection between time and weather?
3 votes

There may not be a single origin; who knows. But the Greek word used is marked, and that does suggest a more explicit connotative meaning than what @Mitch described in his answer. Here's how I've ...

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What is this sentence structure called?
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6 votes

"X is wh-relative clause" is an inverted pseudo-cleft: https://glossary.sil.org/term/pseudo-cleft-sentence. The X is itself a sentential anaphor, and the relative clause predicate restates the ...

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What is the etiology of the word for ‘pyramid’
8 votes

InB4 Downvote. The entry on pyramís in Chantraine's Etymological Dictionary of Ancient Greek cites two senses of pyramís: "pyramid", and "grilled wheat grain cake mixed with honey" (Ephippus, cited ...

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Is There A Limit To Valency/Transitivity?
6 votes

Of course, whether a nominal is a complement or an adjunct of the verb makes a big difference as to whether it should be counted in valency. The artificial logical languages Loglan and Lojban permit ...

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How does 'like a book' befit the Translative, and not Essive, Case?
4 votes

I can't speak Estonian either, but I can grab the first Google link that comes up: https://www.colanguage.com/translative-case-estonian Estonian cases, like all cases, can develop idiosyncratic ...

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Minimal English: Lack Of Clarity And Redundancy
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5 votes

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=cbM4DwAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=phone&f=false I'm flabbergasted that the Natural Semantic Metalanguage people have ...

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Is there truly no semantic notion that underlies the prefix 'for-'?
Accepted answer
3 votes

My thanks to @ukemi for pointing out https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/for-#English There is metaphor and hyperbole at work here diachronically, and I'd argue we can't meaningfully posit a single ...

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How did 'narrow' semantically shift to mean 'strong'?
Accepted answer
1 votes

This is Auto-antonymy, correct? No, because the antonym of "strong" is not "narrow", it is "weak", and the antonym of "narrow" is not "strong", it is "wide". Can someone please expound this ...

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How did 'man's time on earth' semantically shift to mean the 'earth' itself?
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1 votes

I actually think the more interesting meaning shift is from "era" to "habitat". (This is of course a reprise of the perennial Lakoffian metaphor TIME IS SPACE.) Ancient Greek usage of aeon seems to ...

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Why was the Passive Present Progressive judged vulgar compared to the Active Present Continuous?
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5 votes

McWhorter doesn't expound why the Passive Present Progressive was judged unbecoming. The answer is in the text: because it was a grammatical innovation. Grammatical innovations are routinely seen as ...

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Is there any specific term for "English-originated?
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2 votes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anglicism An Anglicism is a word or construction borrowed from English into another language. Or, more prosaically (and more common), English loan. OP asks for a ...

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For X to be considered a language, it must possess a partial function from sequences of _____ to meanings. What word goes in the blank?
2 votes

The notion of double articulation is the fact that the answer to your question is both phonemes and morphemes, with morphemes being inherently meaningful units (so that the mapping to meaning is at ...

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How often are dictionary etymologies wrong?
Accepted answer
5 votes

I'm going to describe the situation in Modern Greek. In Modern Greek, you will get good etymologies in the the contemporary dictionaries, Babiniotis' and Triantafyllidis', both of which date from ...

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'sibling-in-law' constructions: Why the polysemy/vagueness?
4 votes

The expression of family relations does not occur in a social vacuum: it is tied up with the cultural norms surrounding those relations. If you live in a society where the dominant norm is the nuclear ...

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Analysis of 'fuck off has he', 'bollocks do they', and the like
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12 votes

This kind of construction occurs in multiple languages (e.g. Irish, Cantonese, Modern Greek); it is called Devil Negation, or Rude Negators. Comments above expressed confusion about the examples from ...

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Animal sounds across languages
8 votes

Onomatopoeia is non-arbitrary, but that doesn't mean it's immune to the normal processes that happen to any arbitrary word—including: arbitrary historical choices of onomatopoeia (like @acattle ...

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Abbreviation taking the meaning of the whole expression
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2 votes

Misleading to refer to abbreviation in this context. If we leave out words in a fixed expression, e.g. Watergate affair > Watergate, that's sometimes referred to as truncation—though I agree with ...

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How and when did some European languages acquire retroflex d and t?
2 votes

/ll/ > /ɖː/ in several Italian dialects (and, under Calabrian influence, in Calabrian Greek): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sicilian_language ḌḌ— The -ll- sound (in words of Latin origin, for ...

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"Have in view" - origin
2 votes

Modern Greek has "have under view = to be aware of", έχω υπ' όψιν and "take under view = to consider", λαμβάνω υπ' όψιν; the morphology is Ancient. The phrase is classic Puristic, but it appears to be ...

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Do languages still invent absolutely new single words, or is coining done around pre existing words?
4 votes

Do arbitrary coinages happen in language? Yes, but they appear to be rare, especially if we also remove onomatopoeias and sound symbolism from consideration (which OP has not done). FWIW, https://www....

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Can Ernie's laughter be classified phonetically?
1 votes

I've always thought it was an affricate (I'm puzzled at the notion it could be a fricative), and in fact I've always imitated Ernie by producing a lateral affricate; [tɬ]. (And that was long before I ...

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Wordplay in ancient texts
10 votes

Aristophanes (Knights 21–26), much earlier than the Philogelos, punned on repeating molōmen auto, molōmen auto "let us go, that" ending up sounding like the taboo automolōmen "let us desert". ...

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On the etymology of Ankara / Phrygian Ἄγκυρα
3 votes

We don't know, and Pausanias' Just-So story likely means nothing at all. (You've already pointed out, @midas, the implausibility of your namesake finding any anchors in Ankara.) FWIW, this is what ...

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Status of ISLRN (International Standard Language Resource Number)?
Accepted answer
1 votes

The ISRLN website says nothing about who is behind it. It in fact says nothing about who is behind it so loudly as to cast the whole enterprise into doubt. Wikipedia and the European Language ...

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Abbreviations for pinyin and hepburn transliterations?
Accepted answer
4 votes

ISO has codes for languages (ISO 639), and for scripts (ISO 15924); but it has no codes for transliterations, as you can see by perusing ISO's standards on Writing and Transliteration. ISO adopts and ...

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Is the Sanskrit spoken natively in pockets in India changing?
5 votes

I proofread for publication a recent article on spoken Sanskrit: McCartney, Patrick. 2017b. Jhirī: A ‘Sanskrit-speaking’ village in Madhya Pradesh. Journal of South Asian Languages and Linguistics 4, ...

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why did the Franco-Provençal language decline in Switzerland?
6 votes

The marginalisation of Franco-Provençal in favour of Standard French predates the modern French state. Franco-Provençal was coextensive with the Duchy of Savoy, and the Duchy adopted Standard French ...

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Where does the spelling <ea> and <ee> in English come from?
1 votes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_English ea Rare, for /ɛː/ (see ee). ee /eː/, becoming [iː] by about 1500; or /ɛː/, becoming [eː] by about 1500. In Early Modern English the latter vowel ...

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"Dash" dialog punctuation in different languages
4 votes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quotation_mark#Quotation_dash: This style is particularly common in Bulgarian, French, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, ...

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