Dominik Lukes
  • Member for 8 years, 7 months
  • Last seen more than 1 year ago
What's the difference between phonetics and phonology?
4 votes

I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the form/function distinction. Phonetics studies the nature (acoustic and articulatory) of sounds that humans produce while speaking. Phonology studies their ...

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Why do European languages use a similar alphabet, but South East Asian languages do not?
14 votes

The answer to this question is fairly straightforward along the lines of historical developments and cultural influences and goes pretty much along the lines offered by jamesqf's answer. However, a ...

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Do all languages have sentences?
7 votes

I think even a better question would be do any languages have sentences? Sentence is an artifact of writing and punctuation. You can see how this study found it hard to compare sentence length in ...

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Is the very concept of the phoneme disputed?
3 votes

The one point that doesn't seem to have been mentioned is the distinction between segmental and non-segmental approaches to phonology going back at least to the 1960s. So while something phoneme-like ...

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Mapping graphemes to phonemes in CMUDict
2 votes

We just finished a project for which we developed a Phonics Engine (see paper https://www.researchgate.net/publication/280147388_Building_a_Phonics_Engine_for_Automated_Text_Guidance) that does ...

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Where is American English not chosen as the dialect of English taught as a second language?
4 votes

There is generally no single policy across different countries as to what English is taught across the board. Countries in Europe and Asia default to British English - the most popular textbooks (...

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What are the state-of-the-art English syntax theories there are that can explain all the English syntax phenomena?
0 votes

In some way, this question just underscores the fundamental problem with 'syntax' theory. It takes an idealized notion of 'a correct sentence in a language' and tries to come up with formal rules for ...

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Can syntax be part of semantics?
1 votes

The definition of parts of speech is an uneasy mixture of semantic and formal properties. So nouns and verbs can be identified largely semantically with some important reference to formal properties ...

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Is there a grammar of syntax that takes into account inherent syntactic ambiguity in natural languages?
3 votes

Yes, cognitive and construction grammars do take ambiguity into account. However, they have to give up a lot of the formal properties of traditional constituency and dependency grammars. It resolves ...

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Are linguistic units organized in conceptual categories?
3 votes

Yes, there are many patterns of conceptual organization evident in language.It shows up in all sorts of psycholinguistic effects such as priming as well as in the way language structures are related ...

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Are British and American English two different dialects?
Accepted answer
5 votes

There's no precise definition of dialect (or language for that matter). All you need to know is that there are systematic differences in pronunciation, morphology, syntax and lexicon between the ...

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Will my child learn incorrect grammar from me?
4 votes

This depends. Your child can only learn what she gets from the input. So, if you consistently say 'goed' instead of 'went' or drop the third person singular endings on verbs ('she run'), that's what ...

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Is Language infinite?
13 votes

The headline question: Is language infinite? should perhaps invite more scrutiny than it's generally given these days. It was posited by Chomsky in the context of a particular view of language: "A ...

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Has any research been done on the effect of introversion on language learning?
Accepted answer
0 votes

This is a very hard area to research because of so many confounding variables and the fundamental difficulty of measurement of both introversion (or similar personality traits) as well as progress in ...

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How many of all possible English words are actually in use (have meaning)?
0 votes

It depends on how you approach this. It would be relatively easy to generate English non-words using phonotactic rules and then calculate the proportion. As others have said, it is likely to be quite ...

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Grammatical Aspect and Lexical Aspect
5 votes

As luck would have it, I'm just preparing a talk on aspect at a conference. The problem, with your question is that you're looking at aspect in isolation. Your sentence (as a sequence of words) is ...

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Arbitrariness and coinages
Accepted answer
1 votes

This is a good question because it reveals the problematic nature of the arbitrariness axiom in modern linguistics. The relationship between sound and meaning is indeed arbitrary when you look across ...

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Why givin’ instead of giving?
Accepted answer
1 votes

The answer is very simple. The -ing suffix is pronounced either or /in/ or . The choice of pronunciation of the -ing suffix depends on: Dialect of English: There are three dialectal choices in ...

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Which branch of linguistics educates on affirmation, causality, similarity, time, etc…?
2 votes

This is a bit more complicated than just the branch. Both semantics and pragmatics will deal with aspects of this issue but you also need to pick the right school and the right people to read. People ...

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Am I using the right terms in referring to "soft" and "hard" vowels and consonants?
7 votes

There is no universal technical meaning for 'hard' and 'soft' when it comes to sounds. You will not find it used by professional phoneticians. However, within many languages, there are pedagogic ...

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For a toddler who has just begun to speak, is Hindi easier to speak as compared to English?
1 votes

There are several parts to your questions. Is Hindi easier to speak for children? No. All languages are about the same level of difficulty for children. How come the child is learning even when she ...

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What gives rise to racial accents? (timbre)
Accepted answer
5 votes

There are several elements to this issue: Your ability to identify ethnicity is much more likely to be a result of perceiving cultural styles of speaking than anything physiological. You would most ...

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Linguistics relativity and linguistic determinism
1 votes

Linguistic determinism is a broader philosophical and psycholinguistic question about the relationship between thought and language. Linguistic relativity is a position that 1. the relationship ...

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Are there laws of semantic change?
3 votes

This is a good question but only in the sense that it opens a possibility for rejecting the very premise on which it is based. The short answer is, there are no laws formulated for linguistics that ...

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How are affirmation, causality, similarity, time, etc... connected?
1 votes

Well, the easiest thing is to connect similarity and causality. This is the foundation of so called sympathetic magic. If your voodoo doll is similar to you (e.g. by having some of your hair), actions ...

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How can I find which words don't exist in a language?
3 votes

The only way you can really determine the lack of an equivalent lexeme in a language is through the process of translation (by a competent, experienced translator). The answer by @user6726 is ...

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Characteristics of Theoretical Linguistics
2 votes

The answer to this question very much depends on who's asking and why. And what stage of your linguistic studies you are at. For the lay person, I'd start with James McCawley's "To ask a professional ...

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Is this a nonce word or is there another name for a regularly constructed neologism?
1 votes

Nonce is used in two senses in linguistics: 1) an 'occasionalism' - word used in a one off conversation and 2) a non-existent word (non-word) following the phonological patterns of the language used ...

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To which extent are people’s perceptions of their own pronunciation influenced by the language’s orthography?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Yes, there have been many studies of this. A quick search of Google Scholar will reveal many references. This article on non-word processing has a good overview of the literature: There is now ...

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Is syllable boundary properly annotated at the phonetic or phonological level?
1 votes

It very much depends on what you're trying to accomplish. If you're focusing purely on the segmental aspects (ie individual sounds) then syllable boundaries will not offer much additional information ...

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