Sjiveru
  • Member for 8 years, 7 months
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Do languages change at different rates?
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12 votes

Languages definitely change at different rates. A clear contrast is between Icelandic and some dialects of Norwegian - Icelandic has one of the slowest rates of change observed (Icelandic schoolkids ...

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Does language improve over time, or does it just change?
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10 votes

Superiority/inferiority is by definition arbitrary, at least in the realm of linguistics. Any language is ultimately able to convey any thought, and that's all that really matters. I can't really ...

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Agglutinative vs. Analytic. What's the difference?
Accepted answer
7 votes

Your analysis is correct - the typical criterion is whether or not the affix/particle seems to act as part of the word it attaches to. When nice phonological demonstrations like vowel harmony aren't ...

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Do some dialects of English have a liquid vowels, such as /ɹ/ and /ɫ/?
7 votes

These syllabic consonants (that's what the technical term is) are totally present in English. There is no true vowel in 'world' for me either, the [ɹ] is the syllable nucleus. It doesn't honestly ...

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The word 'all' as an article, rather than an adjective?
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6 votes

As @Cerberus has commented, these are often lumped into the category of 'determiners', which in English also includes what you've referred to as articles (the, a), possessive pronouns (my, your), and ...

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Is there use of a trilled "L" sound in any language? Is a trilled "L" even possible?
6 votes

It seems to me that lateral and trill are mutually exclusive - trills require repeated opening and fully closing, while laterals require a state of half-closure. If you drop the sides of your tongue ...

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Consensus among linguists about Ryukyuan varieties of Japonic
5 votes

The problem with the language/dialect distinction is that it always, always, always involves politics. Even when trying to do things on a purely linguistic basis, there are far too many borderline ...

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Languages with the fewest phonemes
5 votes

Central Rotokas (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotokas). It has five vowels (/a i u e o/) and three consonants (/p t k/), for a total of 8 phonemes.

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Why was korea able to remove kanji but japan wasn't when both languages use homophones?
4 votes

It's probably just a government policy thing - Japanese kids start learning kanji basically as soon as they're done with kana, while Korean kids don't start learning hanja until they're in middle ...

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Caucasoid people, Common Genetic roots and Common Proto-Language?
4 votes

Language and genetics, as much as they tend to correlate, don't necessarily have to at all. People can, and do, frequently adopt languages that have no connection at all to their own ancestry. It may ...

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How do directional morphemes work independant of relative positions of the speaker and listener?
2 votes

It seems like it would work in much the same way that 'there' does in English - it doesn't specify any actual direction other than 'away'. I would assume that =[tok] means 'away from the general area ...

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Does there exist a rating scale for the "conferability" of languages?
2 votes

Any language is, ultimately, able to convey any idea that a speaker might wish to convey. Certain languages might find certain ideas easier to convey than others (for reasons ranging from 'having a ...

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Strong accents and rural areas correlation
1 votes

It's purely based on the fact that the standard variety is based off the speech of a region these speakers don't come from. If theirs was the standard and yours wasn't, they'd say the same thing about ...

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How did OF. peindre derive from L. pingere, with a "-ng-" > "-nd-" change?
1 votes

My guess would be that the -e- is lost, then ng assimilates to nd before r. I don't know what the rest of the paradigm looks like, though (because this particular sound change could only take place in ...

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Are there glides in Italian?
1 votes

It really depends on how the language treats those kinds of vowel-vowel pairs. If the 'uo' in 'uomo' is treated like a single vowel, then it's a diphthong; but if the 'u' is treated like a consonant, ...

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What's a grammatical infelicity?
0 votes

A sentence is infelicitous when it's grammatical but nonsensical. See, for example, Chomsky's famous 'colourless green ideas sleep furiously' - there's nothing wrong with the sentence on a grammatical ...

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How are topic-phrases represented in X-bar trees
0 votes

To the best of my knowledge, there's a node for topics that's a child of C' (and a sister of either TP or another C', IIRC). It's the same place that fronted nouns in V2 languages like German and ...

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