xji
  • Member for 7 years, 8 months
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Why does ISO 639-3 have many language codes for Arabic but only one for English?
9 votes

Are the languages spoken in various Arabian countries actually mutually intelligible? If no then it makes more sense to regard them as separate languages. In China the government likes to officially ...

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Massive Open Online Courses on linguistics
4 votes

I also faced the exact same problem. Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be that many online resources for this field, and the existing ones aren't really that good (e.g. the one by Leiden University, ...

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What are the fundamental differences between Natural Language Processing and Computational Linguistics?
3 votes

Some time has passed since the original question. For people looking at this question now, I'd say "Computational Linguistics" certainly encompasses more researches related to humanities, such as ...

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Does your brain make a distinction between vocal and non-vocal language?
3 votes

There really isn't just one high-level, abstract, "language production/comprehension process". That view would be much Chomskian and is now generally derided. Language production/comprehension is the ...

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Are there any good theories explaining the language aspect of the Zipf Mystery?
2 votes

One research group at our university is particularly interested in the statistical properties of language. One professor, Michael Ramscar, is teaching us some classes this semester on related topics. ...

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Why is Korean considered a language isolate?
2 votes

My mother tongue is Chinese and I speak neither Japanese nor Korean yet I don't think they really sound close. I will definitely not mistake Japanese speakers as speaking Korean. It's very easy for "...

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Is Mandarin understandable by Taiwanese in written context if simplified characters are mapped to traditional ones?
1 votes

It's not very different at all. I'd say the difference is much smaller than the difference between say Spanish in Spain and Chilean Spanish, which have undergone 500 years of evolution after all. Yet ...

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Are there natural languages with the following properties (seen in Esperanto)?
1 votes

For typological questions you can consult related databases, such as The World Atlas of Language Structures (the most widely used), AUTOTYP, SSWL to get the answer. As mentioned, Arabic might be one ...

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Could you point out some theories on how the names for numbers developed?
1 votes

This might not be directly what you were looking for, but if you're interested in the "names" for numerals, one thing I think might be valid is the point of "discrimination", i.e. because the numbers ...

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Languages w/out morphology
0 votes

I have a feeling that this question has been asked somewhere, or maybe it's about monosyllabic languages. Anyways, while modern Mandarin Chinese is less isolating and indeed has words consisting of ...

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NLP techniques on semantic similarity with different sentence construction
0 votes

You may look at deep learning approaches in general. This would be similar to what "reading comprehension tasks" are trying to achieve. Search for some papers and you shall find related ones, for ...

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Are there any known natural languages in which tense is never (or very rarely) expressed through the modification of verbs?
0 votes

I think what you're searching information over is Inflectional Morphology First I'm not sure the idea that "it just seems to be taken for granted that tense is expressed by modifying the verbs." is ...

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Why was korea able to remove kanji but japan wasn't when both languages use homophones?
0 votes

Theoretically you can always express any 漢字("kanji" in Japanese) character with just Roman characters, it's just that there would be a lot of duplications. There was a proposal in China during the ...

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What is the difference between complements and adjuncts?
0 votes

This webpage offers another explanation. http://www.ucl.ac.uk/internet-grammar/phfunc/compare.htm Complements mostly immediately follow the head. They bear a much closer relation to the head than ...

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Are there any languages or cultures that have genderless given names?
-2 votes

I'd say this (names indicating gender) might actually be quite a western-centric phenomenon and I'm not sure whether it's even mainstream in the world. It's totally possible that more cultures give ...

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