Lucian
  • Member for 7 years, 2 months
  • Last seen more than a week ago
Ei (egg in German) and eye; Auge (eye in German) and egg
12 votes

Notice the consistent phonetic correspondence between the English -(e)y- and the German -(i)g- or -(i)ch-: honey - Honig, yester(day) - gestern, day - Tag, eye - Auge, etc. The reason for this ...

View answer
Why is the Romanian syntax for "Good night!" opposite to all the other Romance languages?
3 votes

Why is this? For one very simple reason : in Romanian, unless one does not purposefully wish to sound either poetic or theatrical, the adjective follows the noun rather than preceding it. Therefore, ...

View answer
Etymology of "Haggard" has anything to do with Hagar in Islam?
Accepted answer
2 votes

No, there is no etymological connection between the two. In English, -ard and -art are suffixes, used in the formation of many words. The word suggests hag as a root, and is related to the German hag(...

View answer
How did French lose the Latin -v-?
2 votes

Why might the Latin -v- have been lost in French? Why were the Latin intervocalic -v- and -b- lost in Romanian as well? alleger from alleviare; neige from nivea; jeune from juvenis. Notice that ...

View answer
Cognates for men, non cognates for women
1 votes

You seem to compare things "crosswise", so to say : dona/donna The equivalent of the Romanian doamna (mrs./lady), the feminine of domn (mr./lord), corresponding to the Spanish dueño/dueña (...

View answer
r in Romance names of London
1 votes

How did that “r” end up in Romance names of London? Most probably by a combination of rhotacization and metathesis. It is not uncommon for intervocalic n to become r (e.g., Latin monumentum yielding ...

View answer
Is there a clear linguistic reason for Swiss German not being considered its own Germanic language?
0 votes

I’ve recently heard the Swiss talk among each other [...] I found it fascinating how I couldn’t make out a single word while speaking German. Swiss German (Allemanic) and Standard German differ ...

View answer
Does the English "Garden" come from the French "Jardin" or the German "Garten"?
0 votes

I always assumed that the English word Garden was similar to the German Garten due to the Germanic roots of English. If it looks like a duck, and it walks like a duck, then it's obviously a duck ... ...

View answer
Language origin of english words by usage
0 votes

If you want to establish the origins of a language, there are two main things which have to be taken into consideration: basic vocabulary, and grammar. The former is what would weigh the most, were ...

View answer