Aspinea
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  • Germany
What is word order used for in "free word order" languages?
13 votes

I can think of the following effects Latin can achieve with its word order: Intelligibility. When words that syntactically belong together stand close to each other, the sentence is easier to ...

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What is the difference between "anaphora" and "deixis"?
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10 votes

I don't know any Japanese, but generally, an anaphora is an expression that refers to something mentioned earlier in the text: John is tired because he has been working all day. Mary said the moon is ...

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The Koran: anything special about this book linguistically?
7 votes

For many (most?) languages, there is such a thing as a standard variety among a number of dialects. For English, which has several standards, some of these would be Standard English and General ...

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Is there a technical term to describe a sequence of letters that may or may not be a word in a given language?
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6 votes

"Token" is a term for a string that might or might not be a word. I don't think there is a term for non-word. The definition of the term "word" is not always entirely straightforward itself; for ...

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Why is English spelling so inconsistent?
5 votes

Look up "Great Vowel Shift" in either the German: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Vowel_Shift or English http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Vowel_Shift Wikipedia.

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Are /w/ and /j/ considered to be consonants?
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5 votes

There is a sonority hierarchy of phonemes and phones, in which [w] and [j] are certainly closest to the vowels. Where exactly in this hierarchy you draw the line between vowels and consonants, or ...

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diphthong vs. digraph (English)
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4 votes

You are right about their being concerned with sound and graphemes, respectively. A diphthong is concerned in particular with vowels. The term refers to a combination of two vowels characterized by a ...

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Understanding Voiced Consonants
2 votes

From what I remember form a phonology class I took in unversity, the voicing of consonants is something that comes with fortis-lenis distinction at least in German and English.

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Is there a US/UK difference in interpretation/usage of "compound verb phrases" split by an embedded clause
2 votes

This is a case of PP attachment problem, the classic example for which is I see the man with a telescope. Am I using a telescope and seeing the man through it, or am I seeing a man who is using a ...

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Are there dictionaries like Collins COBUILD for other languages than English?
0 votes

There is the Digitales Wörterbuch der Deutschen Sprache (DWDS) for German.

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English: Why can’t you ever find [l] opposed to [ɫ]? And why can’t you ever find [h] opposed to [ŋ]?
0 votes

If I understand your idea of opposition correctly: [l] and [ɫ] are allophones, which menas they are varieties of the same phoneme. Only two different phonemes can be in opposition with one another. ...

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