Questions tagged [pitch-accent]

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5
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0answers
105 views

Why do I speak in a lower (deeper) voice in foreign languages compared to my mother tongue

I'm a native German speaker. I myself and friends have noticed, that when I speak in English, my voice becomes lower (deeper) and if I speak in Finnish, even lower than in English. If I concentrate I ...
1
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2answers
48 views

Choosing/Adjusting settings away from the standards in a Praat script

I am analyzing dyadic conversations for speech characteristics through pre-written script. I spoke with an expert in speech analysis prior to data collection as an introduction to praat. He suggested ...
0
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1answer
77 views

Do stressed (in e.g. English) or pitched (in e.g. Japanese) phones contribute to different phonemes?

In proper tonal languages such as cantonese or mandarin, the phones a phoneme comprises of share the same tone. In other words, mā (in pinyin) and má are clearly different phonemes. If I were to look ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Are there any standards for the manual modification of fundamental frequencies in Praat?

While analysing pitches with Praat, I'm often faced with the problem, which is, I must modify the F0 data manually since there are always some octave up points or other points which is impossible to ...
0
votes
1answer
204 views

What type of stress does French have

So I know that there are on the one hand pitch-accent languages (like South-Slavic languages, Greek, Norwegian, etc.) where the accentuated syllable is indicated by a particular pitch contour/tone ...
3
votes
1answer
156 views

What’s a good example a language phenomena in which f0 is NOT correlated to pitch?

It’s standard doctrine that “pitch is perceived f0”, and that f0 is phonetic and corresponds to pitch which is phonological ... no problem there. (Even if this is a simplification) But I wonder if ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

In what sense if f0 not an objective measurement?

I always assumed a dichotomy between f0 and pitch, such that the former is objective/physical whilst the latter is subjective/mental. Then, I was introduced to this presentation and article. ...
2
votes
1answer
221 views

How is “rising tone” the same in all tonal languages?

If we compare two unrelated languages with lexical tone, where both languages have the same number of tonal contrasts, are there any universals/tendencies regarding: the kinds of tonal contrasts (...
1
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1answer
69 views

Pitch movements in English

As each language can be said to have an "inventory" of pitch movements which are felicitous (?) or anyway possible, I wonder what sequences of pitch movements characterize English (but not e.g. French ...
4
votes
1answer
234 views

Sound files for Lithuanian pitch accent distinctions?

I'm looking for sound files that illustrate the distinction between the two pitch contours of long vowels and diphthongs in Lithuanian, e.g. kóšė (falling pitch) vs. kõšė (rising pitch). Does anyone ...
1
vote
0answers
105 views

Pitch-Accent languages like Ancient Greek sometimes acquire a dynamic component. Any papers on this change?

This is kind of the opposite of tonogenesis. All languages with stress use a combination of pitch, force and duration to represent a stressed syllable. Some use only (or primarily) pitch. What ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

How are Tone and Intonation languages different acoustically?

On what aspects Tonal languages differ from Intonation languages when analyzing them acoustically? On intonation and tone: Jones (1960) - "the variations which take place in the pitch of the ...
5
votes
1answer
6k views

Difference between pitch and intensity

I would like to understand what is the difference in lignuistic betwen pitch and intensity. On the picture (taken from native HK speaker), I have a Cantonese sentence. Nei5 Jiu3 Caa4 Maa3 ? ...
13
votes
4answers
531 views

Are there documented languages that evolved from tonal to nontonal?

There is a theory about tonogenesis for the Chinese language, thus Chinese had once a more complex syllable-structure and no tones. In the course of time, the syllable structure became less complex ...
4
votes
3answers
524 views

Are there languages in which lexical pitch accent and phonemic vowel length vary independently?

According to Glottopedia, lexical pitch accent happens when the only indicator of an accent (aka stress) on the syllable is pitch--elevated pitch on the accented syllable. (http://www.glottopedia....