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7 votes

Does Japanese have pronouns?

The OP focused on one peculiarity of Japanese pronouns: they can be qualified. One can note that in English 'me' rather than 'I' would be qualified and if there is any conjugation it will be in the ...
Mathieu Bouville's user avatar
3 votes

Does Japanese have pronouns?

There is no real linguistic definition of a “pronoun”. Grammatically, however, words that are often called “pronouns” in Japanese behave in an identical distribution to any other normal noun. But, ...
Zorf's user avatar
  • 320
3 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between a light noun and a nominalizer?

The terminology is most commonly used in Sino-Tibetan, Japanese and Korean contexts. I suggest taking a look at this (warning: gigantic volume, probably a good idea to find an electronic version if ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
3 votes

Proto-Slavic a-stem locative plural in -asъ?

It seems the use of x in -axъ is thought to be related to the "ruki" law. However, becasue this is not the usual context for the application of this sound law, it is supposed that some kind of analogy ...
brass tacks's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Tree diagrams in CGEL

I've always wondered about this tree too. In particular, I wondered why from Lloyds would be a complement. And so I asked Geoff Pullum, who replied that he thinks that salary doesn't take complements. ...
Brett Reynolds's user avatar
2 votes

Proto-Slavic a-stem locative plural in -asъ?

-asъ changed to -axъ in this context, it’s a pretty known fact in historical Slavonic linguistics. Note that -s- can still be found in modern Lithuanian in plural locatives.
Atamiri's user avatar
  • 2,590
2 votes

What is the hypernym of names, unique titles, and definite descriptions?

What you are looking for is probably the singular term, i.e. a term that inherently refers to an object, see here. On the other hand, following Frege, we have predicates (or functions) denoting ...
Artemij Keidan's user avatar
2 votes

Reference and modality - T. Givon (2001), Syntax

Givon does seem a little unclear here. I think he needs to allow for the traditional predicate nominal. In "She is a teacher", "is a teacher" means "teaches" -- it's a predicate, not a reference. ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 12.5k
2 votes

Reference and modality - T. Givon (2001), Syntax

I think the most important part is this sentence: One of the most sensitive cross-linguistic tests for modality involves the referential behavior of NPs under various modal scopes (see Ch. 10). ...
WavesWashSands's user avatar
2 votes

Does Japanese have pronouns?

This is somewhat complicated by the fact that many people who write about this stuff in English are not professional linguists nor professional scholars/historians of the Japanese language: they ...
Ecrit de la Japonographie's user avatar
1 vote

Finite Nominalised Clauses

I can only answer for your general question. If we define the difference between a finite clause and a non-finite clause by the fact that the non-finite clause does not include subject whereas for the ...
amegnunsen's user avatar
  • 1,535

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