We changed our privacy policy. Read more.
5

No, the argument vs. adjunct distinction is essential for most theories of syntax, and there is no theory I am aware of that would view any part of the sentence Bill gave Jessica a gift as an adjunct. Many adjuncts can be identified using certain diagnostics. Take the adverb yesterday as an example: Bill did it yesterday. It can be separated off and put in ...


4

I've now read the relevant section. I indeed find the quote on my page 11. The quote appears in Section 1.5, which presents the "Theoretical Framework" employed in the book. This framework is a highly idealized version of syntactic structure that builds on some very specific presuppositions about the nature of syntax. John Lawler's comment is on the money ...


4

To my understanding, it has none. Theta-roles are semantic concepts. But this "it" doesn't exist on the semantic level: it only appears because syntactically, English doesn't allow a verb without a subject. In other words, the "it" exists only on the syntactic level and lower, not the semantic one.


3

Andrew Radford (Radford 2004) discusses it on p. 351. Go is an unaccusative verb, which means, under Radford's analysis, that the subject originates in spec-VP, unlike in the case of transitive (unergative) verbs, where the subject originates in spec-vP. This is what Radford proposed. However, it doesn't mean that everyone has the same interpretation of ...


3

I believe that theta roles have to be considered universal or else they are a useless concept. By definition they have to do with the underlying meanings and relations in a statement. When it comes to general word definitions it is very difficult to find one-to-one correspondence between languages because ordinary words tend to be polysemous and can have ...


2

Let's start with standard GB theta theory. In your sentence "I saw the tall kid", "the tall kid" is an NP,1 with "kid" as the head. There is an AP here, as you suggest, but it consists of nothing but the head A "tall", and it's attached as an adjunct to the N. Something like this: Adjuncts don't assign theta roles to their heads. Theta assignment is the ...


2

If you "hear that only complements and specifiers can contain the argument for a verb" ... well, that's really a matter between you and your syntax confessor. Not everybody believes that this is true, however, or even useful. Three-place predicates typically have, well, three arguments. In English, Subject, Direct Object, and Indirect Object, in terms of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible