Questions tagged [wh-words]

Wh-words are question words such as "what", "who", "where", "why" etc, which are used to ask for objects, persons, place, time or similar circumstances.

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Are WH-determiner, WH-adverb and WH-pronoun mutually exclusive?

I was going through this article. It describes WH-determiners, WH-adverbs and WH-pronouns. Below are examples for each from the article: WH-determiners What book are you reading? Which plane is he ...
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Possessive vs non possesive WH-pronouns

I was going through Jurafsky book. It says following about pronouns in the context of tag set: Wh-pronouns (what, who, whom, whoever) are used in certain question forms, or act as complementizers (...
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Wh-movement Question

For wh-movements, I always think of what the sentence would have looked like if it wasn't a question (e.g. for sentence "which promise did he not keep?", I would think that the original ...
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Allowed surface locations of [+wh] phrases apparently depend on semantics—if so, how and why?

Consider Harvey's machine can resemble a human completely or not at all. 1a) ... The extent to which it resembles a human is determined by its software. 1b) ... To which extent it resembles a human ...
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"It" referring to [+wh] phrases and the syntax of "as to"

Consider 1a) It's up to you whether you actually leave. 2a) It's up to you which path you take. 3a) *? It's up to you for whom the bell tolls. 4a) * It's up to you the path you ...
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Why isn't this sentence in a passive form? [closed]

I found this sentence in a grammar book for grade 10 Which CD sells the most? A traditional music CD. I wondered why it isn't in a passive form, or just because it's used in spoken context?
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"To whom" in pied-piped infinitive relative clauses

In English wh raised from, or in situ in, a direct object or prepositional object, you can almost always use "who" at least as well as "whom",1 and in some cases you can only use "who": Who/whom did ...
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Why is *"Where did you move from Paris to?" ungrammatical?

If I'm not mistaken *"Where did you move from Paris to?", while "Where did you move to from Paris?" as well as both "You moved from Paris to London" and "You moved to London from Paris"(at least with ...
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478 views

What is the difference between successive-cyclic wh-movement and long-distance wh-movement?

I am concerned with movement spanning the barrier between two clauses, such as: What did John say [CP that Mary will buy __]? or What did John say [CP will Mary buy __]? //with the same meaning as ...
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Why can interrogatives so often be used-as/made-into intensifier adverbs?

Why does the ability to take normally interrogative words like "what" and "how", and turn them into intensifier adverbs, seem like such a language universal concept? In Japanese, you can take the ...
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217 views

Why do 'wonder' and 'think' act differently in wh-movement?

For instance: Object moving: Who do you think that John saw t? (correct) *Who do you wonder that John saw t? (incorrect) Subject moving: Who do you think t saw John? (correct) *Who do you wonder t ...
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Why is it that the wh-word as a subject in the spec position cannot raise over an auxiliary verb like 'did'?

When the question word is the subject of the clause, there is no aux verb, eg 'Who saw you?'. I understand this, but why is 'who did see you?' also correct, with respect to Chomsky's linguistic theory ...
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Do there exist languages with wh-prepositions?

I can imagine a language where instead of "what did you put a toy on?" one says something like "whon did you put a toy?". Do such languages exist?