Questions tagged [passive]

For questions about the passive, a grammatical voice.

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1answer
170 views

Why is the passive voice more prevalent in English than in other Indo-European languages?

Although the active voice is predominant in the English language the ‘ideal’ proportion of recommended passive sentences is still regarded as between 5% and 10%(source1) ( source2). Which is ...
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0answers
40 views

Data on causatives in Russian and Turkish needed!

I'm working on a comparative syntactic project on the notion 'causative', either morphologically marked or non-marked. References like Haspelmath (1987) provide some (brief) data on the notion of ...
3
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2answers
171 views

Is there a language which uses 'passive voice' more often than 'active' one?

Most languages I know of make use of 'active' more than 'passive'. It appears that the passive is derived from the 'canonical' active. Are there any languages that use more passive than active? Or ...
2
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1answer
64 views

criteria to distinguish resultative from stative participles?

I was recently reading an article by David Embick (2004) in which he makes a ternary distinction among passive participles: 1. stative 2. resultative 3. eventive, contra. Wasow (1977) who ...
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0answers
115 views

Do English passive verbs assign case? (Government and Binding Theory)

I'm trying to think things through regarding case and passive verbs, within the framework of Government and Binding Theory. As starting point, I'll use this statement/principle (based on what I've ...
6
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1answer
130 views

Suppletion of Spanish “matar” (to kill) by “morir” (to die) in the passive

When saying someone 'was killed' in Spanish in the passive voice, muerto, the past participle of morir ("to die") is used: «Selicho fue muerto a golpes por sus propios funcionarios» Galeano ...
0
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1answer
189 views

Why is there not passive imperative? [closed]

It doesn’t exist. I have the proof. Look. It’s missing.
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0answers
77 views

Why passive light v is defective?

In Chomsky (2000,2001), the passive, along with unaccusative and other forms of participle object constructions, with the light v is considered 'defective' because as Chomsky (2001:6) says: light v of ...
3
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1answer
69 views

In German, doesn't using 'von' for agents of passive sentences result in ambiguity?

In German, the agent of a passive construction can be re-introduced using the preposition 'von' (well, 'durch' can be used too, but that's not really relevant). But what if there's another noun ...
4
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2answers
115 views

What methods do languages use to re-introduce the subject of a passive construction?

In German and Spanish (I think), you use the word for 'from'. In Japanese though, I think they use 'ni' (which can either mean 'to' or 'at'). In English we use the preposition 'by', which is rarely ...
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0answers
41 views

Passive voice that is not the main voice in a language

I have a sentence as an example: Patient Trigger Gipalit nako ang mangga. Agent Trigger Nipalit ko ug mangga. I don't understand the contrast. IMO Patient trigger is default and is used for ...
3
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2answers
205 views

Passive: illusion or fact?

I've recently read a book written by J.C Milner, in French, entitled 'introduction a un traitement du passif' (1986), he was influenced by Generative theory and some of his basic assumptions regarding ...
3
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1answer
184 views

Why is the need+concealed passive gerund construction unavailable with polyadic gerunds?

As is well known, the verbs need, require, lack and want, on the one hand, and deserve, justify, merit, warrant..., on the other, can exceptionally take -ING complement clauses with ‘concealed’ ...
5
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3answers
2k views

What is the subject of a passive sentence?

Sentences in the active voice can be converted to the passive voice by - amongst other maneuvers - moving the direct object into the position originally occupied by the grammatical subject. Does this ...
1
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1answer
125 views

Assuming that passives need verbal morphology, which languages commonly said to have a passive do not actually count?

Among others, I recently read the passive definition by Martin Haspelmath (from THE GRAMMATICIZATION OF PASSIVE MORPHOLOGY, 1990), which states (page 26/27 of the book, the second/third page of the ...
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0answers
51 views

Passive Imperatives

The optional subject of an imperative is usually the second person pronoun. I've found something quite peculiar in Malay, where the utterance is an imperative and is passive but the subject is not the ...
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0answers
104 views

Distinguishing “Eskimo”/“Inuit” languages by the passive agent morpheme

In The Origin of Agent Markers by Enrique L. Palancar an attempt has been made to list morphemes used both 1.) as a case morpheme belonging to a noun and 2.) as a morpheme on such nouns that express ...
2
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0answers
128 views

What approaches exist to categorizing kinds of passive agent markers and what are their advantages?

For my thesis I would like to conduct a study on the cross-linguistic distribution of agent markers in passives. In English, this marker is usually realized by the preposition 'by', as in (including ...
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3answers
946 views

Why can't these English sentences passivize?

The active sentences (1a) and (2a) below can be passivized just like most English active clauses, resulting in (1b) and (2b): 1a. His candor struck me. 1b. I was struck by his candor. 2a. Her ideas ...
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2answers
330 views

infinitive passive in Esperanto

Beside "fari" (to do), grammars like this one give six other forms of the infinitive in Esperanto : simple / progressive / perfect / prospective (active) fari esti faranta / ...