Questions tagged [slang]

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27 views

A might adjective phrase [closed]

I recently started wondering about the origins of oss the phrase "a might [comparative adjective]" many times over the years, mostly in informal speech/writing and primarily from the American south. ...
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0answers
41 views

self fulfilling folk etymology

Is there a word to describe when a folk etymology eventually becomes encoded in the language either through spelling, metaphors, semantic change or similar effects on corresponding forms? One example ...
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1answer
261 views

Sociolinguistics and slang [closed]

if slang is part of sociolinguistics, can you give me some explanations about why slang is part of sociolinguistics? what is the relation between slang and sociolinguistics? Thank you
2
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0answers
60 views

What is the difference between “As if!” and other similar discourse markers?

According to Oxford Dictionary of English 3rd edition (2010:90), discourse marker “as if” means, in informal style, “I very much doubt it.” Oxford English Dictionary 3rd edition explains that “as if” ...
3
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0answers
40 views

When were numbers first used as code/shorthand for unrelated meanings?

I was considering this xkcd, which got me wondering, were there any examples of number based shorthand like “ten-four” in the comic used in the time periods this comic considers “old-timey”? In other ...
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2answers
131 views

Can “da” phrase endings used in Russian and Kannada be traced back to the same origin (as in usage, not like cognates)?

Example: Can you get me a coffee da , get off the computer, da even just give me a name, da in Kannada English code switched sentence. And Cosmo in Gaurdians of the Galaxy new Comic series can give ...
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0answers
22 views

References for Italian-American slang (cross-post from English Language & Usage)

This morning I have asked the following question on the English Language & Usage SE: As an Italian, I find the interaction between my language and the English language fascinating. One big ...
1
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1answer
545 views

What is the particular function of “lol” or “lmao” in the middle of sentences?

For example, look at this statement I found on an internet conversation: "Memes are the opener now I guess lmao but that seems pretty good to me." where the statement makes perfect sense without ...
1
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1answer
295 views

Is there a linguistic difference between slang and colloquial speech?

I would have guessed that slang had a slightly obscene (or at least coarse) nature and colloquialism was more an "informal convention of speech" without the negative connotation, but I can't find ...
2
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0answers
83 views

Is there a name for the process of triviliazation of a word's meaning?

What is the name for the process by which a word's meaning is trivialized or diminished in importance from its original meaning? For example, the standard English word throne means a toilet in English ...
2
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1answer
488 views

Financial Slang and NLP for Sentiment Analysis

I am working on a Sentiment-Analysis/Opinion-Mining of Tweets, focused on Finance related tweets. One of the biggest issue I am facing is the unability of my algorithm to detect equivalent entities (...
3
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1answer
347 views

Expressions derived from Italian mafia

I apologize in advance for the explicit words, the question is anyway purely linguistical. Feel free to censore the words if appropriate. I have heard that the American slang expression "Do not break ...
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1answer
204 views

Derivation of “glitzy” — does it have Yiddish roots? [closed]

In Leo Rosten's book, The Joys of Yiddish, he defines the Yiddish word for people from the Hungarian/Polish region of Galicia, as "Galitzianers"(McGraw Hill, 1968), pp. 122-23. In singular masculine ...
3
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1answer
109 views

How do people know the meaning of new rhyming slang?

From the Wikipedia article on Rhyming Slang: One example is replacing the word "stairs" with the rhyming phrase "apples and pears". Following the pattern of omission, "and pears" is dropped, thus ...
1
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1answer
281 views

Colloquial use of adjective that is actually acting as an adverb — examples or formal use?

In a song by rap group NWA they say this: "The bitch sucked one hell of a dick" Disregarding the potentially offensive nature of the quote, it stood out to me that although "hell of a" is an ...
3
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4answers
384 views

Why does google translate produce awkward sentences

Anyone who has ever used Google translate knows that the translated version is mostly grammatically correct but often extremely awkward to use in a conversation. This is one of the factor which has ...
3
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2answers
461 views

What is the sociocultural purpose of banning slang in schools?

There was an article in the Guardian recently about a headteacher in the Black Country banning the use of local dialect in school: (http://www.theguardian.com/educa...) He says he's seeing children ...
4
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1answer
317 views

What is the best way to accurately translate slang?

It may not even be accurate to call it "slang"... I am working on a filtering system that blocks pornography. I have a set of key words and phrases in English. Essentially, I would like to have the ...
15
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7answers
787 views

What is LOLspeak, and does it have equivalents in languages other than English?

I can imagine a French, German, Dutch or Russian version of "teh first language born of teh internets". Does any such exist? And what is LOLspeak anyway. It clearly isn't, as it calls itself, a "...