Questions tagged [compounds]

A word consisting of more than one root.

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Across languages, what, if any, syntactic or semantic differences distinguish compound verbs from serial verb constructions?

Across languages, what semantic or syntactic differences distinguish serial verb constructions from compound verbs? Let's disregard phonological differences for the purposes of this question. Let's ...
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2answers
120 views

What is the difference between compound words and derivational words?

I know that compound words are made up with two small words, but is "tax-free" or "timeless" compound word? How about "thought-free"?
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Part of speech of the word 'board' when in a compound word

When splitting the compound adjective 'onboard', there are two words; 'on' and 'board'. 'On' is a preposition, but what part of speech is 'board'?
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Is there a principled reason behind differing compound verb stress in English?

Is there a principled difference between compound verbs in English with stress on the first root and those with stress on the second root? First root stress compound verbs: Dropkick Spoonfeed ...
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1answer
171 views

Is there a language without compound nouns?

The Wikipedia article on compounds claims: All natural languages have compound nouns. Is there a specific source to back this up? Or are there in fact languages that don't have compound nouns? If ...
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1answer
49 views

Combine flexibility + ism , how ? thanks [closed]

I want to use the word flexibility in an "ism" form. I have two possible forms in mind but sure which one is better: flexibilism flexibiltyism Which of the above forms is correct? ...
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440 views

Collocations vs compound nouns

Is there any definable difference between collocations and compound nouns? Or is it just frequency? The answer does not seem to be transparency vs idiomaticity - looking at the text I'm presenting to ...
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1answer
72 views

Are bound forms in compounds more resistant to sound changes?

In English, words like cleanliness or breakfast have preserved an older vowel than those in the free forms clean and break. In Japanese, compound noun accent tends to match between dialects, even ...
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2answers
71 views

Compounds: Comparing Hyphenated With Other Forms?

Compounds can vary by: spanning multiple words without using a hyphen spanning multiple words and using a hyphen being only comprised of 1 word Some compounds seem common in all forms. E.g.: pick ...
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2answers
350 views

Rules to constructing a proper compound noun in Ancient Greek

I am currently in the process of translating a text from one language into another, and the original uses a compound noun that can either be translated into English as "fly-eating" (losing the ...
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291 views

Complete List of English Compound Words?

I am looking for a complete list of English compound words (or a frequency list of English compound words). Ideally, I'd prefer a list that lists the compound word and also its constituent words (for ...
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2answers
64 views

Should compounded words through agglutination be treated as unigrams or n-grams? [closed]

In a statistical language model, should one tokenize compounded words through agglutination as words by themselves (unigrams) or should they be tokenized into n-grams? Example: Staatspolizei (ISO ...
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1answer
262 views

Replacement of the letters in Japanese while compounding words

I've spent some time solving Fakepapershelfmaker NACLO problem, and later at solution I've read that some japanese letters do not require replacement while compounding. In Japanese you should ...
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91 views

Term for nouns strung together by conjunctions

In the sentence: Men, women and children are people. What is the term for the combination of nouns and conjunctions found in the subject position? "Compound noun" doesn't quite seem to fit the ...
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1answer
57 views

Having trouble with assigning stress degrees to a long compound

I need to give the stress degrees for each component in "compressed air powered fence post driver". If I want to argue that "compressed air powered fence post driver" is a compound, what are the ...
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2answers
135 views

Name of rule for whether compounds should be written with a space or not

What is the name of the rule that describes why some words are written together (e.g. "strawberry") and others apart (e.g. "street name")?
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πίστις & ἐλπίζω related linguistically?

This is stemming from a question on BH-SE. Are faith (πίστις) and hope (ἐλπίς) related linguistically? Is it at all possible that ἐλπίς is actually el/eli + πίστις or something + faith? If not, is ...
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198 views

Is there an objective definition of compound words?

I've always had difficulty in distinguishing phrases from compound words. To me, spelling a compound word without spaces between the constituents seem to be mostly arbitrary. For example the spelling ...
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2answers
2k views

Is it possible for a language to have both left-headed and right-headed compounds?

Is it possible for a language to have both left-headed and right-headed compounds? And can one please explain this with examples and with the use of linguistic reasoning based on morphology?
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2answers
144 views

The complement of postmodifying prepositional phrases compounded by “and”

How does one parse "the need for and development of education"? "Education" naturally acts as the complement of both the prepositions "for" and "of", and the prepositions surely postmodify the nouns ...
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1answer
124 views

Singular versus plural in certain locutions: Is there a name for this?

I wouldn't touch that idea with a ten-foot pole. He's a tool maker. In Germany, Catholics and Lutherans pay a church tax. The zebra stripes indicate a pedestrian crossing. He is a resident of an ...
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1answer
153 views

On an anthropological feature of German etymology (e.g. Pusteblumen)

A curious and nice property of German is that some nouns don't have, say, intrinsic names, but composed (German!) names according to the human use or perception. For instance: Pusteblume (...
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1answer
235 views

Tools to identify lexicalization

Is there any tests or morphological test which can help to identify whether an expression is lexicalised or not? For example, whether some compounds are processed through morphological processes or ...
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0answers
45 views

How much do languages vary when it comes to the prevalence of compound words in their lexicons?

Apparently, languages differ when it comes to the prevalence of compound words in their lexicons. For example, the fact that compound words are more prevalent in Chinese than in French was mentioned ...
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2answers
650 views

Are there agglutinative languages without a propensity for long compound nouns?

I've noticed a propensity for agglutinating languages to also permit quite long compound nouns. Finnish, Turkish and Hungarian certainly have them and I've been finding a few now that I'm trying to ...
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1answer
2k views

How common are the different semantic types of compounds?

According to the Wikipedia article, Compound (linguistic), compound words that occur in natural languages can be semantically grouped into four categories. Witness this quote from the article: “...
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3answers
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English co-compounds? Is bittersweet a co-compound?

I'm looking for English or other standard European language co-compounds, and for other common examples. I came across "bittersweet" but I'm not sure if it's really a co-compound. It has a ...
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715 views

What determines how noun compounds are formed in a language?

In English and other Germanic languages, noun compounds are formed simply by “appending” the nouns in a certain order. For example, phrases like this are very common: electricity price comparison ...