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Questions tagged [articulation]

What the body (mouth, throat, nose, lungs) does to pronounce a sound or 'phone'. Se also phonetics.

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46 views

Is there a variation in the point of articulation for the alveolar tap depending on word?

I don't know if this is true, but it seems to me that the point of articulation of the tongue tip against the roof of the mouth for the alveolar tap varies depending on the kind of sound that precedes ...
3
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0answers
39 views

Is there such a thing as an articulatory home base for a given language, and how could it be characterized?

I've been mulling over the idea that articulatory gestures should be looked as excursions from a home base that varies according to language and accent, and that defining sounds just in terms of the ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Are the vowel charts of male and female the same regardless of scale?

The vowel chart of female is boarder than that of male. Are the two systems overlapping regardless of scale, i.e. by dividing by a number? If not, what are the differences and what does that mean?
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1answer
79 views

proper terms for tipper and dipper S articulation

I just learned for the first time from a WIRED video about movie accents (at 4:30) that American English has multiple possible places of articulation for the "S" sound. I was able to find terms for ...
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1answer
28 views

How can we get the precise articulation resulted from adding diacritics?

I am not sure about the articulation of the sounds with diacritics [sʰ sʲ lʲ] and so on, since [s] is originally aspired; [sʲ] could be taken as [ɕ] in some documents. Are there any books or texts ...
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2answers
103 views

How many ways are there to produce alveolo-palatal fricatives?

My textbook mentions three: laminal prepalatal, dorso prepalatal and postalveolar palatalized. If we take each name strictly, they'll surely denote different gestures. I'm okay with this, what ...
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1answer
50 views

Diagram of all IPA sound places

Wondering if there is a diagram similar to the following one, but that lists all of the mouth configurations such as for ʃ and everything else.
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1answer
33 views

Dental and labiodental fricatives with different relative positions of the articulators

Are there distinct phonemes for labiodental fricatives articulated with the upper teeth touching the lower lip from the inside (like in English /f/) and ones that are articulated with the tip of the ...
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1answer
90 views

Mapping the pulmonic consonants in English to its corresponding place of articulation

I'm following this wiki chart to map the English consonants into its corresponding place of articulation. I can see that some sounds in English like /w/ they do not exist in that char. So, I'm ...
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0answers
64 views

What's the difference between articulatory features and articulatory gestures?

I'm confused about those two terms, but based on my understanding articulatory gestures are represented by the vocal tract variables and articulatory features include all units are involved in ...
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0answers
22 views

How to convert a vocal tract constriction variables (TVs) values to articulation features

I'm reading about TVs and I'm trying to figure out, how to convert their values to the corresponding articulation features like stop, palatal, unvoiced, bilabial, etc. Are there any ranges of values ...
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2answers
52 views

Can a single vowel (or consonant) be pronounced in multiple ways (different place/manner of articulation)

I recall from my undergrad Phonetics course (many years ago), the professor was talking about the limitations of describing phonemes by place and manner of articulation. I seem to remember an example ...
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1answer
194 views

Is a creaky voice a glottal trill?

When I pronounce an approximant, a trill, and then a stop, I have an impression that they are discriminated by the strength of articulation (the "strength of articulation" here means the strength of ...
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1answer
640 views

Disambiguating place vs Manner of articulation

Some aspects of the IPA chart are not intuitive to me. I tend to think of "place of articulation" as "where a sound is produced" and "manner of articulation" as "how a sound is produced". Is this a ...
1
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1answer
103 views

Voiced fricatives are just breathy approximants?

When I pronounce [v] and [ʋ], [v] sounds just like [ʋ̤]. This led me to analyze them via spectrum. So I recorded [f], [v] and [ʋ] with my smartphone, moved them to my computer, normalized them with ...
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1answer
68 views

Should secondary articulation in front of the uvular nasal have a sonic effect?

I was performing some Catford-style "experiments" with nasal consonants, and found that slight opening of the mouth or rounding/unrounding of the lips has no particular sonic effect on, for example, [...
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1answer
148 views

Production and dialectology of Dutch /s/

I am trying to learn Dutch and I am struggling to produce the /s/ phoneme in the same way that some (most?) native speakers do. It seems that the usual pronunciation is such that it sounds closer to [...
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2answers
428 views

zh sound with a flat tongue?

This is from the Wikipedia article on retroflex consonant, but isn't this wrong? I assume that Mandarin zh, ch, sh, and r sound should be pronounced with your tongue curled up, rather than "flat?" ...
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2answers
137 views

Evidence of connections between f0 and a physiological parameter?

I have the impression that physiological parameters like e.g. the size of neck will alter their f0. It's just an impression but it seems to hold - I can usually guess someone's neck size over the ...
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1answer
31 views

What are the most distinctive differences in the glottal wave between modal vs breathy phonation?

I understan that with modal phonation the glottal wave has a triangular shape, whereas with breathy voice, the source wave is closer to a sine wave. This means that the higher harmonics are more ...
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1answer
41 views

Why are the higher harmonics less prominent in a spectrum of modal (as opposed to breathy) phonation?

I'm trying to learn more about breathiness. I understand that the cepstral peak is less prominent in the cepstrum of breathy phonation than plain ol' modal phonation -- but I'm not sure why this may ...
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3answers
288 views

What is the difference between an alveolar trill and a syllabic alveolar trill?

I wanted to understand how to articulate the sound ṛ from IAST (transliteration system for indian languages). On Wikipedia i have found this explanation: ऋ पृ [ərə] (traditional) or [ri] (...
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2answers
70 views

What is the role of watching articulation in learning pronunciation?

It's obviously easier to pronounce and, perhaps even acquire, a sound or sequence not present in one's native language if one watches carefully a speaker's mouth. What is this phenomena called? Where ...
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2answers
794 views

How does passing air through a narrow glottis cause vibrations?

I'm studying phonetics as part of a Linguistics degree, and in my textbook, the author discusses how we make our vocal folds narrow, almost touching, such that air passing through vibrates. This is ...
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1answer
379 views

Roles of the vocal cords

I've heard that there are 3 parts to the vocal cords: the true vocal cords, and the "false" vestibular folds and ventricular ligament. I read that the vestibular serves some function in chanting and ...
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1answer
462 views

Can the term “homorganic” be applied to vowels and glides?

As I understand it, "homorganic" means having the same place of articulation, and is said of sounds like [k] vs. [g] and [s] vs. [t]. (I couldn't find a definition from a linguistics source on the ...
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5answers
8k views

Are there any languages or cultures where people speak while inhaling?

In English, a 'gasp' exclamation seems to be the only word spoken while inhaling. Though it is sometimes implied that the expression is not voluntary, it typically is in most conversations. I was ...
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1answer
2k views

Secondary articulation vs assimilation

I was teaching a linguistics class and I came across this topic "secondary articulation". It was the first time for me to hear the term. I had always known that the effect of a preceding or following ...
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2answers
144 views

What is the phonological process whereby a speaker uses [ʊ] as a replacement for [l]?

What is the phonological process whereby a speaker would use [ʊ] as a replacement for [l]? Some examples off the top of my head; [lɪtl] -> [lɪtʊ], [gɪgl] -> [gɪgʊ], [twɪŋkl] -> [twɪŋkʊ]
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1answer
323 views

Multimedia materials for pronunciation learning

I randomly found this terrific site that contains a good structured collection of images, animations and videos to show how a sound is articulated in the German, Spanish and American English languages....
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2answers
472 views

Cross-linguistic association between velarization and pharyngealization

Articulatorily, velarization and pharyngealization are distinct, but they are often conflated in linguistic analyses I've seen: Conflating them is common enough, I presume, that the IPA allocates the ...
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2answers
220 views

Producing sounds that are not used in one's mother tongue

Why is it that someone who is fully capable of producing a sound foreign to their own language has trouble using that sound in languages that do use it? For example, let's say that an English speaker ...
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2answers
687 views

Has there been any research into the phonetics of ventriloquism?

I have always been impressed by the skills of ventriloquists - and I've been wondering lately whether anyone has done any work looking at the acoustic or articulatory properties of the speech of ...
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3answers
3k views

Why does stop VOT duration vary depending on place of articulation?

From the (albeit citation needed) section of the Wikipedia article on aspiration: Spanish /p t k/, for example, have voice onset times (VOTs) of about 5, 10, and 30 milliseconds, whereas English /p ...