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Questions tagged [turkish]

Spoken in Turkey - the most widely spoken Turkic language.

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Were يانيه and یانیه interchangeable in Ottoman Turkish?

Copy/pasting from this official pdf from the Turkish government produces يانيه. Czech Wiki uses the same spelling. English Wikipedia and Wiktionary, however, both use the spelling یانیه. Those look ...
lly's user avatar
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Formal syntax and semantics for Turkish

as a student of linguistics and admirer of Turkish, I wondered whether there are good introductory books for formal syntax and (Montague) semantics for Turkish. Thanks in advance!
pahohu's user avatar
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What is the rule in Turkish called where /e/ becomes [æ] when preceding a syllable final nasal or liquid consonant?

Examples of these are words like "sen" [sæn] vs [se̞n] (you) "sel" [sæl] vs [se̞l] (flood) where the latter realizations sound less natural to the average Istanbul Turkish speaker. ...
vef4's user avatar
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615 views

Why is vowel length not considered phonemic in Turkish?

Excuse me if this is a very novice question, but there are pairs in Turkish like "yağma" /ja:ma/ (plunder) and "yama" /jama/ (patch), or "olan" /olan/ (one that's there) ...
vef4's user avatar
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Is direct reported speech more common in Turkish than indirect reported speech?

Working in subtitles production, I have noticed direct reported speech is very common in Turkish TV shows dialogs. In Hebrew, my target language - and I thinks in English, as well - it is more common ...
Avital's user avatar
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recommendations on turkish-->ipa dictionary

Preferably a research-quality text. It doesn't need to be edited in English necessarily; and can be based on any dialect or standardization since the republics founding. I'm not a native speaker, so I ...
Paul Eugenio's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
970 views

What is the origin of the turkish word for cannibal, yamyam? [closed]

Someone posted a screenshot of a google translation of the word cannibal on a social network site. It seems to translate to yamyam in Turkish. I found that both funny and bizarre at first and am ...
Hoov's user avatar
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Mysterious uncertainty about ablative case in Turkish

Yesterday I was watching a Turkish trivia game show on TV when a question came up about the ablative case in Turkish. The question, asked during a part of the show when questions are generally deemed ...
mdirkse's user avatar
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In agglutinative languages with long "sentence words", how do they conceptualize of these "words" and their parts?

I asked a similar question on languages with "small words": In languages with "small words", how do they conceptualize of these units? How do agglutinative languages with long, &...
Lance's user avatar
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Strange vowel harmony in Arabic loanwords within Turkish—why could it be?

Some Arabic loanwords have a palatalised, for example, /lʲ/ in final position, and it is more understandable in the case of those words. However, some others go against vowel harmony for no apparent ...
murshad's user avatar
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What's the phonological explanation of Turkish speakers pronouncing "r" as "sh" at the end of the word?

I'm a native Turkish speaker and I recently started noticing people around me pronounce "r" as "sh", sometimes [ʒ], when it's at the end of a word. So it's like, Hayır -> Hayış ...
vef4's user avatar
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Is the Turkish /n/ dental apical or dental laminal?

According to Wikipedia the Turkish /n/ is dental, but it doesn't specify whether it's produced by the tip or the blade of the tongue.
Manar's user avatar
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Do Turkish sentences have to ever "fall back" to using extra words instead of using suffixes?

I just was thinking about how you might run into problems (in a language like English), where using affixes break down because they are too simplistic (they are used for the common/simple case ...
Lance's user avatar
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Where or when did modern Turkish start using the English-like 'r'?

In the Kazakh language we don't have any rolled out American "R". Why does Turkish have it? When did it develop? It's so strange to hear American R in Turkish.
ERJAN's user avatar
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Etymology of the Turkish word "rüzgâr"

In Turkish rüzgâr means "wind". From the looks of it (especially the long â vowel which is not native to Turkish) it seems to be of Persian origin: "روزگار". Some sources verify ...
Mousa's user avatar
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şapka and шапка - which way did the hat travel? [closed]

The russian and turkish words for hat : şapka and шапка are very similar. It makes me suspect that one language borrowed it from the other. Which way did the hat travel?
mathreadler's user avatar
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Turkish stem consonant alternation

I am currently writing a paper which draws on the characteristics of Turkish (or Turkic) phonology, and would like to know more about stem consonant alternation in this language. Specifically, will ...
Alice's user avatar
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7 votes
4 answers
6k views

Are the longest German and Turkish words really single words?

First, I don't speak/understand any so-called agglutinative languages, like Turkish. I also don't know German. I understand there's no good definition for the concept of "word", which could ...
GA1's user avatar
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is there a /c/ vs. /k/ or /g/ vs /ɟ/ minimal pair in turkish

i checked the wiki subarticle "Consonants" and there is an example of /kar/ vs /ca:r/ (youglish link, as evidence for ":") which might not be a good minimal pair. do you know one? /...
cottn's user avatar
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Is the Turkish word for brother(kardeş) of Indo-Iranian origin?

I looked up the word for "brother" in other Turkish languages. In Ubzek it is aka. And in Volga Tatar the corresponding word is abi. The word "kardesh" sounds suspiciously similar ...
Mr X's user avatar
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Are Turkish aorist (wide-tense) verbs originally finite or nonfinite?

There are countless examples in Turkish of third person aorist forms in -A/Ir or -mAz (negative form) which are employed as nouns: gelir (income), gider (spending), yazar (writter) or adjective su ...
Erithacus Rubecula's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
236 views

A bit confused in the possessive case of Turkish Language [closed]

I am learning Turkish Language and the possessive cases are confusing me. I am learning it form a site and there is this one case that is really confusing. I have to translate "The dog eats your ...
Muhammad Ahmad's user avatar
-6 votes
1 answer
160 views

Could Gothic ahs (ear of grain) and Turkish ak (white) be cogante?

Could Gothic ahs (ear of grain) and Turkish ak (white) be cogante like English wheat and white ?
Nurlan's user avatar
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Why does Latin, Turkish, and Albanian share common words?

Latin and Albanian are Indo-European languages so it makes sense that those two languages share many words with each-other. But why is it that Turkish — a non-Indo-European language — shares words ...
Get Chimp's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
183 views

Resemblance Between Turkish Ablative and Locative, Ancient Greek Ablative, Allative

I was studying some Ancient Greek, and found out that the declination of some irregular nouns are very similar. I started wondering if there is actually a language that is mother of Altaic languages ...
oguzalb's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is there a high-quality academic reference resource for an extensive overview of a language?

If I wanted a general introduction to for example the Turkish language, I can look up articles on Turkish in Encyclopedia Britannica, the Routledge Compendium of the World's Languages, the ...
julkarham's user avatar
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2 answers
412 views

Are there traces of Old Turkish in ancient Germanic languages?

The question is quite clear and understandable as in the title. Are there traces of Old Turkish in ancient Germanic languages? Or traces of Germanic in Old Turkish?
Sami Bülbül's user avatar
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67 views

Data on causatives in Russian and Turkish needed!

I'm working on a comparative syntactic project on the notion 'causative', either morphologically marked or non-marked. References like Haspelmath (1987) provide some (brief) data on the notion of ...
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Can causative and anticausative co-occur in Turkish verbal morphology?

Turkish makes use of two valency markers: (i) the causative marker with 'tur' which increases valency in (1) below, and (ii) the anticausative marker 'il' which decreases valency as in (2) below. (1)...
Tsutsu's user avatar
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365 views

How "üçün" is Turkic but "çün" is Iranic?

Azerbaijani: çün Persian: çun Means: because Origin: Persian Azerbaijani: üçün üç+ün old-Turkic: uçun Means: because of Origin: old-Turkic So, can somebody explain how this is possible? More ...
Sina Sharifzade's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

Turkic etymology dictionary

Is there a new Turkic etymology dictionary? I don't want something like Nişanyan which all Turkic words are Sogdian or Persian origin. I want something that analyses the words using true rules not ...
Sina Sharifzade's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is there a "maximal coda principle"?

The "maximal onset principle" says that, in many (most) languages, consonants will attach to a syllable onset rather than a coda when given the choice. For example, "walking" /wakɪŋ/ in English is ...
Draconis's user avatar
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16 votes
4 answers
21k views

Are Hungarian and Turkish related?

I was told by somebody who has lived near Hungary that she thought that Hungarian and Turkish were related, and that their languages are very similar. A brief google search seems to support this. ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
357 views

How to call Turkish to Ascii character conversion?

When writing software in some cases we are not allowed to use Turkish characters so we use U, G, S, I, i, O, C characters instead of Ü, Ğ, Ş, İ, ı, Ö and Ç since some computer systems might not ...
Ekrem's user avatar
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24 votes
3 answers
9k views

Reversal of kinship terms when speaking to a child

When Turkish people speak to children, they often address them with the kinship term that the child is supposed to use for the speaker. For example a mother may call her child "anneciğim" ("my dear ...
cyco130's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
945 views

Turkish voice to text speech recognition references

Does anybody know what is approach implemented in Google Speech API and Siri for Turkish voice to text speech recognition? I'm interested in details of these two services, not the general or ...
Aksakal almost surely binary's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
293 views

Is Turkish older than Bulgarian?

I've read that Turkish is a very old language, but I can't really find any information on how old Bulgarian is. Which of those two languages is older?
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5 votes
0 answers
391 views

Similar diminutive name construction in Turkish and Armenian

In Armenian diminutive for personal names are formed by adding 'o' for some short part of the name (I'm intentionally not calling this short form "root" cause it's not necessarily a root), so some ...
shabunc's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
610 views

Turkish "Yaz" vs. Azerbaijani "Yaz"

In some Turkic languages (like Turkish and Kazakh), the word Yaz means Summer, while in other Turkic languages (like Azeri, Chuvash and Yakut) the very same word means Spring. The Old Turkic meaning ...
Mousa's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
222 views

Is "Qadaqan" Mongolian or Turkish? [closed]

In Persian, the word Qadaqan (q is an uvular stop consonant, i.e. having the same place of articulation as the French r) means "emphasis" and "illegal", in some Persian dictionaries it is mentioned as ...
Mohsen Nirouzad's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
8k views

why is erdogan pronounced erdowan? [duplicate]

i've heard the Turkish president's name pronounced in about 100 ways. what's the right way, and how does that connect with the latin letters? P.s. this is not a duplicate. I did not ask about g in ...
mobileink's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
573 views

most common Turkish words

I'm trying to learn most common Turkish words but I can't find resources, I've already finished 1000 words. Where do I find the most common Turkish words, at least 10k?
primee's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
803 views

Adjectives in Turkish always comes before the noun?

I've read that in Turkish adjectives always comes before the noun. So to say "nice house" we say "güzel ev". But we also could say "the house is nice", and in that case this becomes "ev güzel". My ...
user1620696's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
612 views

In Turkish, regarding the locative, how do we know which suffix (-de or -da) should be used?

I'm studying Turkish, and regarding the locative, I've learned that it is implemented by adding the suffix -DA or -TA, the latter being used when the word starts with "p, ç, t, k, f, h, s, and ş". So ...
user1620696's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
335 views

Turkish kalem: from Anc. Greek or Tocharian?

Usually the Turkish word kalem 'pen' is shown in etym. dictionaries to derive from Arabic qalam, which in turn derives from Greek κάλαμος. However, I noticed that Tocharian languages have the term ...
Midas's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
274 views

Languages lacking detailed words for taste

Unlike most Indo-European languages Turkish for example groups some words for taste under one word e.g. acı. Are there other languages lacking words for example sour, bitter, sweet, salty, hot/sharp ...
Midas's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
408 views

Alemaña/Almanya/ألمانيا etymology

Turkish, Arabic, Spanish for "Germany" are obviously cognate. But not with "Germany" or Deutschland. At least two of them must be borrowed. Which, and what is the (commonly assumed) source?
WGroleau's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
596 views

Etymology of the Turkish word for copper (bakır)

I've been looking for a good explanation on the origin of the turkish word bakır, but I can't find much on it. Is it a loan or is it really a Turkic word for copper?
Midas's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Turkish: the -DIK participles and an information loss

There is something I can't get about the -DIK participles. When we use it to form a relative clause and make one sentence out of two sentences, the object may be originally in any case: Accusative: ...
thorn's user avatar
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0 votes
4 answers
600 views

Plural form declension with numbers in Turkish

When naming some number of objects, there's only one plural form in English (2 dogs, 3 dogs, 10 dogs). But in Slavic languages like Polish the form changes depending on the number (2 psy, 4 psy, 5 ...
Павле's user avatar